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University of London

The University of London is the UK’s leading provider of digital and blended distance education internationally, established by Royal Charter in 1836 and now offering programmes to 45,000 students in 190 countries around the world. Although proudly rooted in London, our community and impact are global. It is a national leader in the humanities, promoting their value to society and the economy through knowledge creation and exchange, through the research institutes within the School of Advanced Study – a national centre for the promotion and facilitation of research in the humanities. As early as 1921, the Institute of Historical Research was formed as a laboratory of ideas in the study of history, and today the Institute of Philosophy’s Centre for the Study of the Senses pioneers significant lab-based collaborations between philosophers, psychologists and neuroscientists. Our research concentrates on the human dimensions to societal challenges. To confront climate change, global mobility, social injustice, human rights, poverty, we will need to understand the human world and to appreciate the critical importance of cultures, languages and identities to the contemporary world. This is at the heart of our research.

The University of London is also a federation of 17 esteemed higher education institutions, with collaboration at the heart of our ethos. The University of London federation is a collective community of more than 240,000 learners and 50,000 staff, delivering world-leading research across all disciplines. Our passion for increasing access to education and mobilising the collective power and expertise of the federation is central to our ability to transform lives around the world and address the global challenges of the future.

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Displaying 41 - 60 of 92 articles

Fidel Castro poured troops into Ethiopia’s war with Somalia after describing Siad Barre as “above all a chauvinist”. Reuters/Prensa Latina

Castro’s troubled legacy in the Horn of Africa: hero or villain?

Many Ethiopians regard Castro as the man who saved their country. Somalis view him as the man who denied them the Greater Somalia re-union
United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon has courageously pursued an enquiry into the mysterious death of Dag Hammarskjöld. Reuters/Tiksa Negeri

Speaking truth to power: The killing of Dag Hammarskjöld and the cover-up

Fifty five years and many inquiries later, the search continues for the truth about the cause of the plane crash in which the UN secretary general and 15 others were killed
The Enola Gay, a Boeing B-29 Superfortress bomber, which dropped the first atomic bomb in history. The bomb was made from Congolese ore. Reuters

How a rich uranium mine thrust the Congo into the centre of the Cold War

The Soviet Union tested its own atomic bomb in 1949, to the profound shock of the US. This heated up the Cold War dramatically and thrust the Congo to the centre of American geopolitical strategy
Artisanal miners at an illegal mine pit in the DRC. At severe risk to their health, some still go to abandoned sites to dig out uranium and cobalt. Reuters/Kenny Katombe

The link between uranium from the Congo and Hiroshima: a story of twin tragedies

The mine that produced the uranium that made the Hiroshima bomb has since been closed. But its troubling legacy continues to haunt the Democratic Republic of Congo and the local community.
Welcome Map est un projet de centralisation de données pratiques à destination des exilés arrivant en Île-de-France. http://www.welcomemap.fr/

Ce grand corps malade… ou la cartographie traumatique de Paris

Retour sur une initiative d’associations parisiennes qui souhaitent établir une cartographie de « l’encampement » de migrants.
Les refugies dans un camp de fortune du jardin d'Eole, à Paris en mai. Mathieu Alexandre/ Afp

L’espace liquide de la Chapelle

Retour sur la cohabitation habitants-migrants dans ces nouveaux quartiers de la capitale, aux contours et aux repères flous.
Twentieth-century political thinker and fighter against colonialism and imperialism, Frantz Fanon, left an indelible mark on history. Tony Webster/Flickr

Revisiting Frantz Fanon: memories and moments of a militant philosopher

For the revolutionary Frantz Fanon it was not enough to celebrate the achievements of decolonisation. It was necessary to educate, to strain at the limits of national freedom and to provoke debate.

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