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University of Manitoba

The University of Manitoba has thrived for 140 years as a place where students come to learn, be inspired and find their voice. We are Manitoba’s largest, most comprehensive university and its only research-intensive post-secondary institution. Our research facilities foster collaboration and scholarship in areas including Arctic system science and climate change; immunity, inflammation and infectious disease; population and global health; culture and creative works; and Indigenous research.

At the U of M we are taking our place among leading universities through a commitment to transformative research and scholarship, and innovative teaching and learning, uniquely strengthened by Indigenous knowledge and perspectives.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 103 articles

Tools from Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) may help manage unpleasant emotions during lockdown stress. (Pexels/Ketut Subiyanto)

Beyond self-care: Try these 5 therapeutic tools to manage stress better during COVID-19 restrictions

As the world faces a second wave of COVID-19 lockdowns, we need new strategies to handle pandemic stress that go beyond basic self-care.
Remote learning doesn’t work for all children. Students sit behind screened-in cubicles at St. Barnabas Catholic School in Scarborough, Ont., on Oct. 27, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Students with disabilities should have the option of in-person learning during COVID-19 school closures

As provinces consider extended holidays, or school closures loom as a possibility under COVID-19, schools should commit to providing in-person schooling for students with disabilities.
Dispatch rider with pigeons leaving for firing line, His Majesty’s Pigeon Service, November 1917, location unknown. (William Rider-Rider. Canada. Department of National Defence. Library and Archives Canada, PA-002034)

First World War poet Wilfred Owen, treated for shell shock, carried readers into the horror of war

British poet Wilfred Owen told readers there is no peace for the dying soldier until we fight against the lie that it is sweet and proper to die for one's country.
An escalation in parental anxiety and depression during COVID-19 not only affects parents’ mental health, but may also have long-term effects on children. (Shutterstock)

Family mental health crisis: Parental depression, anxiety during COVID-19 will affect kids too

Parents of young children are reporting alarming increases in anxiety and depression during COVID-19. This is not only a risk to parents' mental health, but also to children’s long-term well-being.
Instead of returning to “normal” after the COVID-19 pandemic, Canada should adopt a health-care system that focuses on prevention and the social determinants of health. (Pixabay, Canva)

No ‘back to normal’ after COVID-19: Health care should shift focus from treatment to prevention

COVID-19 has shown the flaws of a reactive health-care system designed to care for people who are already sick. A preventive approach would be more equitable, less expensive and keep us healthier.
The Black Lives Matter demonstrations that took place across Canada during the pandemic showed that individual actions can make a difference. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

How to build a better Canada after COVID-19: The power of everyday actions can bring about change

We have seen our ability to act in alignment with public health measures during the pandemic. People's everyday actions could also make a difference in addressing systemic injustice.
Empty shelves in a grocery store in Toronto on March 22, 2020 as customers stock up on dry goods and shelf-stable foods. (Shutterstock)

Supply chain innovation can reduce coronavirus food shortages

Using innovative technologies like Bitcoin and automation can help protect our food supply chains from disruptions like the one caused by the current coronavirus pandemic.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs Chrystia Freeland have relied heavily on the science-based advice of Chief Medical Officer Theresa Tam during the coronavirus pandemic. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Politicians and scientists need strong connections during the coronavirus crisis — and beyond

The effective integration of science into policy-making improves legislation and leads to effective solutions for society — and not only during times of crisis like the coronavirus pandemic.
Knowing when — and when not — to react to a child’s behaviour is a helpful strategy during the stressful time that comes with the coronavirus pandemic. (Shutterstock)

Try these 8 tips to reduce parenting stress during the coronavirus pandemic

Family stress can go through the roof when managing social isolation or pandemic anxiety. A researcher of parent-child relationships offers practical tips to make time together more enjoyable.

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