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University of New Brunswick

The University of New Brunswick was founded in 1785. Throughout our long history, we have influenced the future of thousands of scholars. UNB has helped shape the social and economic landscape of this country and beyond. With nearly 12,000 full-time students, the university offers 75 undergraduate, graduate, certificate or diploma programs and participates in over 30 different fields of graduate work and research. Our university is home to over 3,000 members of faculty and staff who participate in research world-wide.

Building on a tradition of excellence, the University of New Brunswick continues to work to give students the best possible education. By developing programs, increasing international ties, using the latest pedagogies and technologies, and building partnerships with business and governments, the University of New Brunswick is a leading national university.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 34 articles

Purge survivors, at the Fredericton, N.B., Pride Parade in 2018. (Boom! Nightclub)

Discrimination against LGBTQ+ soldiers doesn’t stop just because a policy has been revoked

The Canadian Armed Forces is struggling with sexual misconduct allegations and poor inclusion and diversity. It is imperative to again document the stories of LGBTQ+ soldiers and their spouses.
Ontario Premier Doug Ford walks to his office in June 2020 as legislators debated the government’s legislation that enabled it to invoke the notwithstanding clause. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Notwithstanding the notwithstanding clause, the Charter is everyone’s business

By paying greater attention to the originally intended application of the Canadian Constitution’s notwithstanding clause, along with the diversity of lawmakers in Canada, there’s a better path forward.
Hospital support workers wave to cars honking their horns in support as the protest inequality for essential workers at Rouge Valley Hospital in Toronto in June 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Governments shouldn’t shield essential workers from COVID-19 lawsuits

Provinces shouldn’t prevent Canadians from seeking compensation if an essential service provider’s unreasonable acts cause COVID-19 infection.
Australia’s move to increase fees for some university humanities courses reflects global trends towards market-friendly education that overlook what’s needed for human flourishing. Here, the University of Sydney. (Eriksson Luo/Unsplash)

Stop telling students to study STEM instead of humanities for the post-coronavirus world

Today’s urgent inequality and environmental crises mean that more, not fewer, students should be studying history.
After a six-month delay, the Supreme Court of Canada is hearing arguments against the federal carbon pricing system. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Supreme Court case on carbon price is about climate change, not the Constitution

The Paris climate change agreement aims to limit global warming to 1.5C above pre-industrial temperatures — and the federal carbon pricing plan was meant to help Canada meet its commitments.
A person bicycles past the University of Toronto campus during the COVID-19 pandemic in Toronto in June 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

COVID-19: Don’t make university students choose between education and legal rights

Students won’t be allowed to participate in activities at St. Francis Xavier University this fall unless they sign a COVID-19 waiver. That’s forcing them to make a difficult and unfair choice.
Jane Philpott and Jody Wilson-Raybould are seen during a news conference in Ottawa in June 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Justin Trudeau cabinet resignations a rarity in Canadian history

While the Wilson-Raybould/Philpott resignations are historic by the numbers, they may also prove historic in creating a new faith in federal cabinet, a previously elite and closed decision-making body.
New Brunswick Premier Blaine Higgs is seen in this September 2018 photo. Higgs won a minority government, and must confront both language tensions and economic hardship in his province. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

New Brunswick’s linguistic divide is a microcosm of Canada

New Brunswick’s language politics have vaulted ahead of its teetering economic crisis to potentially become the central political issue in 2019.
This Nov. 14, 2018 photo shows six women who have filed a lawsuit against Dartmouth College in New Hampshire for allegedly allowing three professors to create a culture in their department that encouraged drunken parties and subjected female graduate students to harassment, groping and sexual assault. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

We need to learn from the men who rape

It’s time to stop surveying women about their experiences as rape victims, time to research the men who perpetrate these crimes and work to inebriate and isolate women.
Passengers aboard the MS St. Louis from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Photo Archives. Courtesy of Dr. Liane Reif-Lehrer. Copyright of United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

MS St. Louis apology: How novels can teach us about our past

We can learn a lot about our past from fictional stories. In ‘What is Left the Daughter,’ author Howard Norman presents a cautionary tale from the Second World War of xenophobia and prejudice.
Despite its economic crises, Greece did not falter in its mission to support arts and culture. Rhodes, pictured here, has become a role model when it comes to promoting a visionary cultural policy and supporting a vibrant arts and culture community. Serhat Beyazkaya/Unsplash

What the world can learn from Greece’s passion for the arts

The Greek model of supporting the arts is both old and ongoing; it embraces difference and internationalism and believes art is the cornerstone to civil society. We should learn from that model.
Should wealthy Canadians pay an inheritance tax? In this photo from 2002, David Thomson listens during the annual meeting of Thomson Corp. The Thomsons are considered Canada’s richest family. (CP PHOTO/Aaron Harris)

Should Canada have an inheritance tax?

Canada is the only G7 country that doesn’t have an inheritance tax. A new report says that should change. The idea of sharing the wealth from one generation to another is not new.

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