University of Pretoria

The University is a values-based, research-intensive university that equips its students to succeed in a rapidly changing world by providing students with inquiry-led training and learning opportunities. The University of Pretoria’s long-term Strategic Plan captures the essence of a shared vision, aiming to sustain UP’s quality and relevance as a university that is firmly rooted in Africa, and to harness its existing and future potential for diversity. UP strives to ensure that it is recognised in the global marketplace of knowledge production.

UP has nine faculties and a business school: - Economic and Management Sciences - Education - Engineering, Built Environment and Information Technology - Health Sciences - Humanities - Law - Natural and Agricultural Sciences - Theology - Veterinary Science (the only faculty of its kind in South Africa) - the Gordon Institute of Business Science (GIBS).

The University of Pretoria came into existence in 1908 as the Pretoria branch of the Transvaal University College. The College became a fully-fledged university in 1930 and the colloquial name Tuks, or Tukkies, was derived from the acronym TUC for Transvaal University College. UP’s current facilities portfolio consists of more than 790 buildings and structures spread over 33 sites located on six campuses that cover 1100 hectares of land. In the 106 years of its existence the University has produced more than 230 000 alumni. The University prides itself on producing well-rounded, creative graduates, responsible, productive citizens and future leaders. Great emphasis is placed on student life and support as well as the advancement of sport, art, culture and music.

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French President Emmanuel Macron during his visit to French counter-terrorism forces in northern Mali, in May. EPA/Christophe Petit Tesson

What drives instability in Africa and what can be done about it

Some African countries present a facade of democracy. The absence of substantive democracy is contributing to instability on the continent.
A political body of the AU is second-guessing a legal body in its interpretation of the African Charter, on the basis of prejudice against LGBTI people. REUTERS/Antony Njuguna

African commission turns 30, but threats to its independence remain real

A dispute between the African Union's executive and the commission responsible for overseeing human rights could weaken the protection of peoples' rights.
Africa has focused on tackling undernutrition caused by low calorie diets. IFPRI

Seven African countries show how the battle against malnutrition can be won

Policy choices made by Senegal, Ghana, Rwanda, Angola, Cameroon, Ethiopia and Togo over the past 15 years have led to significant reductions in child undernourishment.
The National Research Foundation doesn’t have enough money for the growing number of researchers who qualify for “incentive” funding. Shutterstock

Money woes force South Africa to revisit how it rewards researchers

South Africa's National Research Foundation will dramatically scale back “incentive” funding to rated researchers, both those who already have a rating and those who will be rated in the future.
Bishop Desmond Tutu during South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission process. Reuters

Timol inquest opens new door to justice against apartheid atrocities

Inquests into atrocities committed under apartheid are important because many South Africans are beginning to question whether justice was done under the country's truth and reconciliation process.
Blazing remnants of the off shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon, off Louisiana, in 2010. The losses produced by polluting companies should cost as ‘negative’ for a country’s growth. Reuters/US Coast Guard/Files

Why capitalism wins. And how a simple accounting move can defeat it

A new accounting system that goes beyond the capitalist understanding of value is bubbling under and could topple capitalism itself.

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