University of Pretoria

The University is a values-based, research-intensive university that equips its students to succeed in a rapidly changing world by providing students with inquiry-led training and learning opportunities. The University of Pretoria’s long-term Strategic Plan captures the essence of a shared vision, aiming to sustain UP’s quality and relevance as a university that is firmly rooted in Africa, and to harness its existing and future potential for diversity. UP strives to ensure that it is recognised in the global marketplace of knowledge production.

UP has nine faculties and a business school: - Economic and Management Sciences - Education - Engineering, Built Environment and Information Technology - Health Sciences - Humanities - Law - Natural and Agricultural Sciences - Theology - Veterinary Science (the only faculty of its kind in South Africa) - the Gordon Institute of Business Science (GIBS).

The University of Pretoria came into existence in 1908 as the Pretoria branch of the Transvaal University College. The College became a fully-fledged university in 1930 and the colloquial name Tuks, or Tukkies, was derived from the acronym TUC for Transvaal University College. UP’s current facilities portfolio consists of more than 790 buildings and structures spread over 33 sites located on six campuses that cover 1100 hectares of land. In the 106 years of its existence the University has produced more than 230 000 alumni. The University prides itself on producing well-rounded, creative graduates, responsible, productive citizens and future leaders. Great emphasis is placed on student life and support as well as the advancement of sport, art, culture and music.

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Zimbabwean President Emmerson Mnangagwa at the funeral of his predecessor, Robert Mugabe. EPA-EFE/Aaron Ufumeli

Mugabe is dead, but old men still run southern Africa

It remains to be seen how much longer the 'old men syndrome' will persist in Zimbabwe, Namibia and South Africa, despite growing frustration among the politically powerless.
Central banks and other financial sector regulators have not always paid adequate attention to the sector’s impact on the environment. Shutterstock

Central banks are waking up to climate change dangers. It’s about time

Central banks are expected to act without fear or favour. But to deal with climate change, they may have to encourage financial institutions to favour certain types of activities over others.
Glencore’s lawyers argued anything about the company in the Paradise Papers was “privileged” and the tax office should be prevented from using that information. www.shutterstock.com

Australia’s tax office can use global data leaks to pursue multinationals, High Court rules

The High Court of Australia has given the Australia Taxation Office a green light to use leaked information about Glencore and offshore tax havens.
Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed’s notion of “medemer” could have united Ethiopians, but seems to have failed. EPA-EFE/ALESSANDRO DI MEO

Ethiopia needs a new rallying point instead of recycling its painful past

Politicians, activists and media outlets continue to deconstruct old narratives and perpetuate new grievances. Nobody, however, is as busy reconstructing a new, inclusive story.
The demand for free higher education is one of the key factors that have led to competing waves of thinking and organisation in the sector. Shutterstock

Universities in South Africa need to rediscover their higher purpose

South Africa's universities are detached from society because of a waning public and civic sector that once fueled the anti-apartheid struggle. Here's what can be done.

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