Menu Close

Articles on access to health care

Displaying all articles

People take a selfie after receiving a COVID vaccine at an Aboriginal vaccination Hub in Whalan, west of Sydney. Dan Himbrechts/AAP Images

Getting vaccinated is the act of love needed right now to support the survival of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples during the pandemic

There have been many barriers for Aboriginal communities to access the vaccine during the pandemic. Despite this, communities are taking the lead in ensuring everyone gets vaccinated.
Indigenous community members receiving a Covid-19 vaccines at a pop-up vaccination clinic at the National Centre of Indigenous Excellence in Redfern. Dan Himbrechts/AAP Image

Whiteness in the time of COVID: Australia’s health services still leaving vulnerable communities behind

Predominantly white perspectives in health practice and policy development can exclude First Nations people in some health services. This is proving evident during the COVID-19 global pandemic.
The town of Wilcannia in the far outback of New South Wales on the banks of the Darling river. shutterstock

COVID in Wilcannia: a national disgrace we all saw coming

The COVID-19 crisis in Wilcannia demonstrates how entrenched neglect has led to a community devastated by the global pandemic.
Measures to combat COVID-19 have affected sexual and reproductive health care around the globe, including maternal and newborn care, birth control and access to abortion. Université de Sherbrooke, Centre interdisciplinaire de développement international en santé (CIDIS)

COVID-19 caused a global setback in reproductive and sexual health rights, especially for women

The exceptional measures deployed around the world during the COVID-19 pandemic have impeded access to urgent services like birth control, abortion and maternal and newborn care.
A still from the animated Heart Foundation video encouraging Aboriginal people to get a heart check. Author provided

Yarns from the heart: the role of Aboriginal English in Indigenous health communication

Indigenous people in Australia experience poorer health outcomes than non-Indigenous Australians. So it’s crucial health messaging is delivered in culturally appropriate ways.
Inuit in the Qikiqtaaluk (Baffin) region must travel long distances south to receive specialized health-care services. (Janet Jull)

Inuit cancer patients often face difficult decisions without support far from home

Inuit living in their traditional territory must travel long distances — often with no personal support — for specialized health-care services like cancer care, obstetrics and dialysis.
Schizophrenia has been identified as a significant risk factor for dying of COVID-19. (Canva)

COVID-19 and schizophrenia: A potentially deadly combination

People with schizophrenia are almost three times more likely to die from COVID-19 than those without the serious mental illness, making it second only to age as a risk factor for mortality.
Premier Scott Moe speaks after a media tour of the COVID-19 mass immunization clinic and drive-thru immunization space in Regina on Feb. 18, 2021. The province also has mobile immunization vehicles to distribute the vaccine to remote communities. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Michael Bell

Mass COVID-19 immunization: Ensuring equitable access to vaccination

One important metric by which we can measure the success of our public health system: Ensuring everyone has access to immunization in their community.
While people with certain disabilities are already at higher risk for severe COVID-19, that risk is increased by elements within the health-care system. (Shutterstock)

People with disabilities put at risk by COVID-19 triage and vaccine priorities

People with disabilities are overlooked for COVID-19 vaccine distribution and triage protocols. We need to make this group a priority and address issues that put them at risk.
With more health resources devoted to COVID-19, non-COVID patients may have unmet health-care needs, which predict poorer health in the future. (Shutterstock)

Collateral damage: The unmet health-care needs of non-COVID-19 patients

With COVID-19 placing heavy demands on the health-care system, non-COVID patients may struggle to access care, putting women, people in poor health and those without a regular doctor at risk.
Because support from specialized professionals and technologies is often accessed through schools, families of children with disabilities may find childcare and education particularly challenging during COVID-19 school closures. (Shutterstock)

Children with disabilities face health risks, disruption and marginalization under coronavirus

COVID-19 has left children with disabilities and their families lacking services, at risk for physical and mental health issues, and fearful of discriminatory choices for treating critical illness.
Incarcerated people are often denied access to treatment for opioid use disorder. This October 2016 file photo shows corrections officer opening the door to a cell in the segregation unit at the Fraser Valley Institution for Women in Abbotsford, B.C. during a media tour. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Fuelling a crisis: Lack of treatment for opioid use in Canada’s prisons and jails

Urgently needed treatment for opioid use disorder is often denied to incarcerated people, feeding the crisis in prisons and jails.
A national licence to practice may be one way to help address the lack of doctors in some regions, and to encourage telemedicine consultations. (Shutterstock)

A national licence for doctors in Canada: Is it really possible?

In Canada, regulation of professions usually falls under provincial jurisdiction, but there may be feasible models for a national licence for health-care professionals.
A Malian mother waits to have her baby vaccinated. Though access to health care has improved, many people say their governments must do more. Dominic Chavez/World Bank

More Africans are accessing health care – but states still have work to do

Across the continent, citizens’ perceptions of health care show several barriers to access and better health for all.

Top contributors

More