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Articles on Anger

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There is plenty we still don’t understand about how anger influences behaviour. (Erinn Acland)

Fanning the flames: How anger fuels violent crime in youth

Violent crime causes untold harm and anger is known to fuel violence. But recent research suggests that the way anger and crime tie together in youth is a bit more complicated than expected.
A mother and son watch as firefighters battle wildfires in Shoresh, on the outskirts of Jerusalem, on Aug. 16, 2021. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)

Rapidly increasing climate change poses a rising threat to mental health, says IPCC

For the first time, an IPCC climate report has assessed evidence that weather and climate extremes are already affecting mental health — and are likely to worsen.
A protester yells ‘freedom’ while attending the anti-vaccine mandate demonstrations in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

‘Freedom convoy’ protesters’ anger is misdirected

Although anger is often an appropriate response to mistreatment, that doesn’t mean we always identify the source of the wrong or injustice correctly.
Research reveals links between the irritability, explosive rage and unstable moods that have grown more common in recent years, and a lack of micronutrients that are important for brain function. (Shutterstock)

Junk food and the brain: How modern diets lacking in micronutrients may contribute to angry rhetoric

Ultra-processed foods high in sugar, fat and empty carbs are bad for the mind as well as the body. Lack of micronutrients affects brain function and influences mood and mental health symptoms.
Trump supporters fight Black Lives Matter protestors at an anti-racism rally in Tujunga, California, Aug. 14, 2020. Keith Birmingham/MediaNews Group/Pasadena Star-News via Getty Images

Angry Americans: How political rage helps campaigns but hurts democracy

Americans are mad – fist-fighting, protesting mad. And that’s just how politicians want voters in election season. But the popular anger stoked by candidates doesn’t just dissipate after the campaign.
Children may be struggling with feelings of abandonment and a loss of security in their lives. (Shutterstock)

Children’s grief in coronavirus quarantine may look like anger. Here’s how parents can respond

Grief encompasses our emotional responses to change and loss, and children’s grief might be expressed in what psychiatrist Elisabeth Kübler-Ross described as the five common stages of grief.

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