Articles on Biodiversity loss

Displaying 1 - 20 of 34 articles

Fire cut a devastating swath through Australia in 2019-20, leaving a heavy toll of death and destruction in its wake. (Shutterstock)

Money won’t save the planet, so philanthropy needs to adapt

Philanthropy in the form of financial donations is not a solution to the natural disasters caused by climate change. A new philanthropy of social change is needed.
A passenger pigeon flock being hunted in Louisiana. From the ‘Illustrated Shooting and Dramatic News’, 1875. (Wikimedia/Smith Bennett)

Why passenger pigeons went extinct a century ago

For decades, the extinction of passenger pigeons has been explained by two theories of human impact. New research shows one of these theories is now more compelling than the other.
Without a radical change of course on climate change, Australians will struggle to survive on this continent, let alone thrive. AAP/Dave Hunt

Scientists hate to say ‘I told you so’. But Australia, you were warned

For decades Australian scientists have, clearly and respectfully, warned about the risks to Australia of a rapidly heating climate. After this season's fires, perhaps it's time to listen.
The Tasmanian tiger is among the best known of our extinct species, but researchers have now revealed the extent of the crisis. TASMANIAN MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY

Scientists re-counted Australia’s extinct species, and the result is devastating

New research has revealed 100 plant and animal species have become extinct in the past two centuries – a far higher number than previously thought.
Framing nature in terms of kinship can motivate people to care about the loss of biodiversity. from www.shutterstock.com

Why a sense of kinship is key to caring about the living world

Our prevailing relationship with nature is based on framing the living world as a set of natural resources. This utility-based worldview perpetuates the drivers of ongoing biodiversity loss.

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