Articles on Biodiversity loss

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Habitat loss to palm oil plantations in Central Kalimantan, Borneo. The forests of Borneo are home to the few remaining Bornean orangutan Pongo pygmaeus, Sumatran rhinoceros Dicerorhinus sumatrensis harrissoni, and the Borneo pygmy elephant Elephas maximus borneensis, among other endangered species. © Ulet Ifansasti/Greenpeace

Habitat loss doesn’t just affect species, it impacts networks of ecological relationships

New research has found that different types of habitat loss can change the stability of whole plant and animal communities.
About 74% of New Zealand’s land birds, including the endemic takahe, are either threatened or at risk of extinction. AAP/Brendon Doran

Despite its green image, NZ has world’s highest proportion of species at risk

The latest update on the environment highlights that New Zealand has the world's highest proportion of indigenous wildlife species either threatened or at risk of extinction.
There are five species of kiwi in New Zealand. Their total number is currently at around 70,000 but the populations may have declined by two thirds in 20 years. from www.shutterstock.com

NZ is home to species found nowhere else but biodiversity losses match global crisis

New Zealand is the last major landmass to be settled some 800 years ago. Since then, changes in land use have been extensive and catastrophic for the country's unique flora and fauna.
An impression of biodiversity sensitive urban design (BSUD) developed by the authors in collaboration with Mauro Baracco, Jonathan Ware and Catherine Horwill of RMIT’s School of Architecture and Design.

Here’s how to design cities where people and nature can both flourish

Australian cities are home to many threatened species but are also where biodiversity is being destroyed by development. But what if planning and design processes built nature into the urban fabric?
The Amazon rainforest is fed by a rich network of creeks, streams and rivers. Informal road construction is now endangering this critical ecosystem. Rickey Rogers/Reuters

Amazonian dirt roads are choking Brazil’s tropical streams

Thousands of dirt roads crisscross the Brazilian Amazon, serving ranchers, loggers and miners. The area's fragile waterways — and the spectacular fish that live in them — pay a high price.
This aerial view shows the catchment of the Makaroro river, in the Ruahine Forest Park. The river was to be dammed for the Ruataniwha irrigation scheme. Peter Scott

Supreme Court ruling on NZ’s largest irrigation dam proposal respects conservation law and protected land

New Zealand's Supreme Court rejected a proposed land swap that would have seen conservation land used for an irrigation dam, but the government is now considering a retrospective law change.

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