Articles on Book review

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A new book by ABC journalist Jess Hill is the result of four years’ investigation into the problem of domestic violence. Shutterstock

See What You Made Me Do: why it’s time to focus on the perpetrator when tackling domestic violence

A new book scrutinises the social and psychological causes of domestic abuse, its terrifying consequences, particularly the impact on children, and the failure of our legal and social institutions to adequately respond.
A collection of essays, personal stories, pictures and poetry reflects on the challenges for women who speak out about assault in the age of #MeToo. Mihai Surdu/Shutterstock

Thirty-five voices, one movement: a new book examines #MeToo in Australia

A new anthology collects the voices of 35 contributors on #MeToo in Australia. The book wades into all the difficult areas, from sexual assault to the culture that enables it.
Members of Brisbane’s Sudanese community celebrate the signing of a peace accord that signalled an end to the Second Sudanese Civil War in 2005. The first recorded African-diaspora settlers in Australia were convicts who landed with the First Fleet in 1788. Dave Hunt/AAP

Growing Up African in Australia: racism, resilience and the right to belong

A new collection of writing by African-diaspora Australians shares a diversity of experiences: stories of displacement, isolation, endurance and the right to call Australia home.
This pin cushion made from the jawbone of a thylacine won second prize in the handicraft section of the Glamorgan Show in 1900. Courtesy Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery

A fresh perspective on Tasmania, a terrible and beautiful place

A new book connects disparate objects and texts to tell the story of Tasmania. It is an inspired enterprise.
Alexis Wright, pictured here in 2007 after winning the Miles Franklin award for her book Carpentaria, is one of many writers first published by University of Queensland Press. Dean Lewins/AAP

Reading the landscape: university publishing houses and the national creative estate

The University of Queensland Press has a peerless record of discovering, nurturing and supporting Australian writers. A new anthology is a cross-section of many of their writings.
The Miles Franklin authors with their novels, clockwise from top left: Felicity Castagna, Eva Hornung, Kim Scott, Michelle de Kretser, Catherine McKinnon and Gerald Murnane. Courtesy Perpetual/ Copyright Agency/ Martin Ollman/Timothy Hillier. Eva Hornung image: Noni Martin.

Your guide to the Miles Franklin shortlist: a kaleidoscopic portrait of a diverse nation

For many years, the Miles Franklin award was a bastion of monoculture. But this year's stories are a diverse reflection of Australia.

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