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Articles on Carbon dioxide removal

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Technology operating today can capture carbon dioxide from the air, but it’s expensive. C Gebald and J Wurzbacher Copyright Climeworks

The climate bill’s projected emissions cuts rely heavily on carbon capture – it would mean thousands of miles of pipeline

One estimate suggests at least a sixth of all emissions cuts expected from the Inflation Reduction Act, expected to be voted on Friday, would come from carbon capture.
This direct air capture plant in Iceland was designed to capture 4,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide per year. Climeworks 2021 via AP Photos

How not to solve the climate change problem

With Congress considering new climate legislation, a climate scientist looks at what works and some popular ideas that aren’t as cheap or effective as people hope.
One ‘mechanical tree’ is about 1,000 times faster at removing carbon dioxide from air than a natural tree. The first is to start operating in Arizona in 2022. Illustration via Arizona State University

These machines scrub greenhouse gases from the air – an inventor of direct air capture technology shows how it works

Klaus Lackner is finding new ways to cut the technology’s high costs and energy demand, and he’s about to launch the first ‘mechanical tree’.
Pictured is a slag pile at Broken Hill in New South Wales. Slag is a man-made waste product created during smelting. Anita Parbhakar-Fox

Our ability to manufacture minerals could transform the gem market, medical industries and even help suck carbon from the air

Manufacturing minerals is an expanding field of study. Making more of them could help alleviate various pressures faced by our growing population. But how are they made, and where can they be used?
Trapping carbon dioxide in minerals happens naturally over thousands of years. Can humans speed it up – safely? Simon Clancy

Can we tweak marine chemistry to help stave off climate change?

Adding industrial chemicals and natural alkaline minerals could slow climate change, but like other geoengineering proposals, it comes with many complex technical and legal challenges.
AAP Image/Mick Tsikas

Carbon emissions will reach 37 billion tonnes in 2018, a record high

For the second year in a row global greenhouse emissions from fossil fuels have risen, putting 2018 on course to set a new record, according to an annual audit from the Global Carbon Project.
Humans have burned 420 billion tonnes of carbon since the start of the industrial revolution. Half of it is still in the atmosphere. Reuters/Stringer

We need to get rid of carbon in the atmosphere, not just reduce emissions

Global warming and carbon emissions, left unchecked, could cause rising sea levels and displace almost 200 million people. But we can still prevent the worst case scenario if we act now.

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