Menu Close

Articles on Chronic stress

Displaying 1 - 20 of 23 articles

Like natural hormones, known as endogenous hormones, the artificial hormones contained in the pill, known as exogenous hormones, can have effects on the brain. (Shutterstock)

The contraceptive pill also affects the brain and the regulation of emotions

Oral contraceptives modify the menstrual cycle. What’s less well known is that they also reach the brain, particularly the regions important for regulating emotions.
The stress of experiencing high levels of community violence harms entire families. skynesher/E+ via Getty Images

Black mothers trapped in unsafe neighborhoods signal the stressful health toll of gun violence in the U.S.

Chronic stress from living with systemic racism and gun violence can lead to increased symptoms of PTSD and depression as well as elevated cortisol levels.
Immunosenescence, or immune aging, can lead to less effective responses to vaccines and greater vulnerability to invading pathogens. Kudryavtsev Pavel/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Social stress can speed up immune system aging – new research

While the immune system naturally gets weaker with age, social stressors like trauma and discrimination can hasten immunosenescence.
Many parents are struggling with burnout, loneliness and mental health problems during the pandemic. (Pexels/Alexander Dummer)

Screaming into the void? Us too. Coping tips for stressed-out families in the COVID-19 pandemic

The science of stress explains why parenting during the pandemic feels so hard. Here are strategies from psychologists for taking back control when you dread yet another challenging day ahead.
A lone cyclist rides past the University of Toronto campus during the COVID-19 pandemic in Toronto on June 10, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

For university students, COVID-19 stress creates perfect conditions for mental health crises

University students had high rates of mental health issues before the pandemic. The additional stressors of COVID-19 and social isolation will make them even more vulnerable over the winter.
Stress about the coronavirus pandemic can actually increase your risk of infection, but exercise can alleviate the immune system’s stress response. Above, a lone jogger in Ottawa, on March 17, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Anxiety about coronavirus can increase the risk of infection — but exercise can help

The immune system can respond to stress in ways that harm health. But there’s a stress-buster that can help keep you calm and healthy: exercise.
African Americans have worse health outcomes and die earlier than whites. Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock.com

Study: Racism shortens lives and hurts health of blacks by promoting genes that lead to inflammation and illness

The recent death of Elijah Cummings at age 68 underscores a disturbing statistic: black men die, on average, five years younger than white men. A study shows racism’s effects on gene activity.
New suicide data indicates that years of record bloodshed in Mexico have traumatized residents in places where the violence is most concentrated. Reuters/Jorge Lopez

Rising suicides in Mexico expose the mental health toll of living with extreme, chronic violence

Ciudad Juárez, on the US-Mexico border, has suffered high levels of deadly violence for over a decade. New suicide data reveals the severe mental health impacts of living with chronic violence.
The threat of Centrelink debt is one more stressor on already vulnerable people. from www.shutterstock.com

Centrelink debt debacle is bad policy for mental health

The controversial Centrelink debt recovery system is bad news for the mental health of the disadvantaged and vulnerable people it targets.
Stressed woman at computer. Via Shutterstock. From www.shuttterstock.com

Stressed by election results? Try neuroscience

This election season has brought more anger and name-calling than any in recent history, and it has affected many of us. Here are some ways you can ward off some of the stress associated with it.

Top contributors

More