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Articles on Climate change policy

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Australia’s overall emissions are rising, high electricity prices remain a burden, and there is nervousness about the summer power supply. Shutterstock

Grattan on Friday: A little more confusion added to the climate policy debate

The climate policy has become an article of faith within Labor, and among many supporters. It's also a policy that in the election split voters Labor needed, attracting some but driving away others.
Butler rejected Fitzgibbon’s proposal saying the government’s target ‘is fundamentally inconsistent with the Paris agreement’. Lukas Coch/AAP

Labor’s climate and resources spokesmen at odds over future policy

Opposition resources spokesman Joel Fitzgibbon has had his proposal to bring Labor's climate change target into line with the government's immediately torpedoed by the party's climate spokesman Mark Butler.
Governments can choose to spend money in ways that support climate change policy, including a shift to electric vehicle fleets. from www.shutterstock.com

Procurement’s role in climate change: putting government money where policy needs to go

New Zealand is introducing new procurement rules to better link government spending with climate change policy. The first target is to reduce emissions profile of the government's vehicle fleet.
It can be tempting to point fingers, but people with other priorities aren’t necessarily bad. AAP Image/Darren England

Not everyone cares about climate change, but reproach won’t change their minds

In the end, climate policy didn't swing the federal election, and for those on the losing side it can be tempting to play the blame game. But listening and respect are much better ways to move forward.
Ontario Premier Doug Ford speaks at an anti-carbon-tax rally in Calgary, in October 2018. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh)

Let’s create climate policy that will survive elections

In order to address a warming planet over the medium and long-term, climate policy must be designed to be adaptable and indeed attractive to those across the political spectrum.
As extreme weather events, like Hurricane Florence, become more common it is time to ask what it will take for the world to finally tackle climate change. Encouragingly, there may be a historical precedent: Victoria London’s handling of the ‘Great Stink’, where growth had turned the River Thames into an open sewer. EPA/JIM LO SCALZO

Will 2018 be the year of climate action? Victorian London’s ‘Great Stink’ sewer crisis might tell us

As climate extremes mount, let's reflect on Victorian London's 'Great Stink' sewage crisis - when things finally became so bad authorities were forced to accept evidence, reject sceptics, and act.
Flood waters rise in the Montreal neighbourhood of Cartierville in May 2017. (Fred/flickr)

Urban floods: We can pay now or later

The risk of urban flooding is rising. Overall, residents and municipalities are ill prepared, but there are steps homeowners can take to protect themselves.
The IPCC’s first cities conference revealed the challenges in bridging the gaps between scientific knowledge and policy practice, and between cities in developed and developing nations. Cities IPCC/Twitter

IPCC cities conference tackles gaps between science and climate action on the ground

The first IPCC conference on cities has highlighted the challenges of reconciling science, urban practices and politics. But it was an important recognition of cities' leading role in climate action.
City mayors have taken on a prominent role in committing to action on climate change through forums such as the C40. Henry Romero/Reuters

This is why we cannot rely on cities alone to tackle climate change

It's a good thing that cities aspire to lead the way in acting on climate change in the absence of stronger national action. But a closer look reveals the limitations of current city-based efforts.
Exxon funded climate scientists while the bulk of its public-facing advertorials argued the science and cause of climate change was uncertain. AP Photo/Mark Humphrey

I was an Exxon-funded climate scientist

A new study confirms what many already know: Exxon for years sowed uncertainty and doubt about climate change in the public. Should scientists reject certain funding sources?
A pre-industrial climate benchmark generally indicates before the Industrial Revolution – but that still leaves a very wide field. REUTERS/Jason Reed

What is a pre-industrial climate and why does it matter?

The Paris climate agreement aims to keep global warming to within 2℃ above 'pre-industrial levels'. But what does that mean, exactly?
After decades of sustainability initiatives, key environmental indicators keep getting worse. The Capital Wind Farm, REUTERS/Jason Reed/File Photo

After 25 years of trying, why aren’t we environmentally sustainable yet?

Why, after decades of international agreements, are we still damaging the environment? New research, looking at dozens of unsuccessful policies, has uncovered the basic elements of failure.
Coal train in Missouri. Assigning a social cost to carbon emissions puts a price on activities that generate them, such as burning fossil fuels. Scott Granneman/Flickr

Curbing climate change has a dollar value — here’s how and why we measure it

To weigh the economic impact of climate change policies, we need to estimate the social cost of carbon. An economist explains how it's done and why the Trump administration shouldn't end the practice.

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