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Articles on Confirmation bias

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If what you’re reading seems too good to be true, it just might be. Mark Hang Fung So/Unsplash

6 tips to help you detect fake science news

Whenever you hear about a new bit of science news, these suggestions will help you assess whether it’s more fact or fiction.
These psychological tendencies explain why an onslaught of facts won’t necessarily change anyone’s mind. Francesco Carta fotografo/Moment via Getty Images

Your brain’s built-in biases insulate your beliefs from contradictory facts

Cognitive shortcuts help you efficiently move through a complicated world. But they come with an unwelcome side effect: Facts aren’t necessarily enough to change your mind.
How do people respond to media coverage of weather influenced by climate change? AP Photo/Andy Newman

Extreme weather news may not change climate change skeptics’ minds

Media reports are starting to directly connect climate change to its weather effects in local communities. But how you respond to those linkages depends on what you already think about climate change.
A new statistical test lets scientists figure out if two groups are similar to one another. paleontologist natural/shutterstock.com

The equivalence test: A new way for scientists to tackle so-called negative results

A new statistical test lets researchers search for similarities between groups. Could this help keep new important findings out of the file drawer?
People who share potential misinformation on Twitter (in purple) rarely get to see corrections or fact-checking (in orange). Shao et al.

Misinformation and biases infect social media, both intentionally and accidentally

Information on social media can be misleading because of biases in three places – the brain, society and algorithms. Scholars are developing ways to identify and display the effects of these biases.
Some of the Facebook and Instagram ads used in 2016 election released by members of the U.S. House Intelligence committee. AP Photo/Jon Elswick

Why social media may not be so good for democracy

A scholar asks whether democracy itself is at risk in a world where social media is creating deeply polarized groups of individuals who tend to believe everything they hear.
The message might not come through if you put all your communication eggs in one theoretical basket. buydeephoto/Shutterstock.com

Facts versus feelings isn’t the way to think about communicating science

Reports of facts’ death have been greatly exaggerated. Effective communication jettisons the false dilemma in favor of a more holistic view of how people take in new information on contentious topics.

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