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Articles on Coronavirus

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Hundreds of residents of Toronto’s M3N postal code, a hotspot for COVID-19 infections, line up at a pop-up vaccine clinic on In April 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Cole Burston

Even with equal vaccination rates, COVID-19 hotspots still have higher infection rates

Hotspot neighbourhoods with greater COVID-19 risk exposure continued to have higher infection rates even when they achieved vaccination levels equal to lower-risk neighbourhoods.
Anti-vaxxers protest outside Governor Andrew Cuomo’s official residence in Albany, New York in June 2020. (Shutterstock)

The inherent racism of anti-vaxx movements

Vaccine resistance movements have always been led by white, middle-class voices and promoted by structures of racial inequality.
Traffic in Jakarta has decreased significantly after the Indonesia government has restricted population mobility to reduce the spread of COVID-19, 4 July 2021. ANTARA FOTO/Hafidz Mubarak A/aww.

COVID-19 in Southeast Asia: all eyes on Indonesia

Two things contribute to increased COVID-19 cases in several countries in Southeast Asia: human mobility and activities and the spreading of new coronavirus variants.
The first Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine dose in Canada sits ready for use at The Michener Institute in Toronto in mid-December 2020, less than a year from when the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a pandemic. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Big Pharma’s COVID-19 reputation boost may not last — here’s why

If Big Pharma wants to achieve the ultimate image makeover, it must capitalize on the current public good will about its COVID-19 vaccines by prioritizing socially responsible practices.
A sculpture of two saints meeting and embracing embodies the importance of touch in Renaissance culture as a form of devotion and ultimately a way to access the divine. (Renaissance Polychrome Sculpture in Tuscany database)

Belief in touch as salvation was stronger than fear of contagion in the Italian Renaissance

After a year of pandemic social distancing, we know touch is a much-desired privilege. In the Italian Renaissance, people longed to touch not only each other, but also religious sculptures.

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