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Articles on Decarbonization

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The ongoing construction of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project, near Kamloops, B.C., in September 2021. China’s clean energy plans could create problems for Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

What China’s plans to decarbonize its economy mean for Canada’s energy exports

Canada has neglected to keep up with China’s climate politics, putting the future of the country’s fossil fuel exports at risk.
The consensus-based nature of the UN climate change summits means any single country with a significant fossil fuel interest can either weaken or sink an otherwise stronger multilateral agreement. (AP Photo/Alberto Pezzali)

Climate change denial 2.0 was on full display at COP26, but there was also pushback

The recent climate conference in Glasgow, Scotland, shows that climate change deniers have shifted their tactics to thwart the efforts of countries to phase out fossil fuel use.
Phasing out fossil fuels means that today’s production is the peak, and that from here on out extraction and infrastructure must decline over time. (Green Energy Futures/flickr)

How Canada can leave 83 per cent of its oil in the ground and build strong new economies

If Canada chooses to keep its oil in the ground, it doesn’t mean turning off the tap overnight. Skilled trades will be key to winding down the industry and building up new lines of work.
A coal mine in Alberta. Canada has adopted a carbon neutral target for 2050. It represents a major change Canada’s approach to reducing GHG emissions. (Shutterstock)

Canada is aiming for carbon neutrality and that will mean big changes to how we produce and consume energy

The goal of carbon neutrality changes everything. Canada can no longer limit itself to solutions that partially reduce emissions here and there. The chosen solution must be zero emissions.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is seeing nothing but blue skies ahead when it comes to his policies on climate change. But will the newly re-elected Liberal government follow through? THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Canada’s federal election made big strides for climate and the environment

While the outcome of the 2021 federal election offered little in the way of change, it may have left Canada better positioned to make progress on reducing greenhouse gas emissions.
Wind turbines near Glenrock, Wyo. AP Photo/Matt Young

The US electric power sector is halfway to zero carbon emissions

Fifteen years ago electric power generation was the largest source of US greenhouse gas emissions. Now the power sector is leading the shift to a clean energy economy.
For more than 20 years, Canada has repeatedly missed its targets to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. It is the only G7 country whose emissions have increased since 2010. (Shutterstock)

Bill C-12: Canada must embrace best practices if it want to reach its greenhouse gas targets

Bill C-12 is a step in the right direction, but its not enough to meet Canada's goal for a decarbonized economy.
Water rushes through the Carillon Hydro electric dam in Québec. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Why Canada should invest in ‘macrogrids’ for greener, more reliable electricity

The electricity sector is expected to play a key role in Canada’s push to net-zero emissions. Enhancing long-distance transmission can be lower the cost of providing clean and reliable electricity.
Joe Biden speaks about climate change and wildfires affecting western states on Sept. 14, 2020, in Wilmington, Del. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

What Joe Biden’s climate plan means for Canada

Biden’s strong climate change position doesn’t appear to have hurt him in the key swing state of Pennsylvania or in the general election more broadly. Here’s what it means for Canada.
A Tsaatan community in northern Mongolia, herding reindeer. (Shutterstock)

COP25 climate summit: Action must include divestment, decolonization and resistance

Who wins, who loses and whose natures are being talked about when nature-based solutions are proposed?

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