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Articles on Human Genome Project

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While resurrecting dinosaurs may not be on the docket just yet, gene drives have the power to alter entire species. Hiroshi Watanabe/DigitalVision via Getty Images

‘Jurassic World’ scientists still haven’t learned that just because you can doesn’t mean you should – real-world genetic engineers can learn from the cautionary tale

As genetic engineering and DNA manipulation tools like CRISPR continue to advance, the distinction between what science ‘could’ and ‘should’ do becomes murkier.
The red mangrove is among the species already selected for genome sequencing. Busara/Shutterstock

Why African scientists are studying the genes of African species, and how they do it

The African BioGenome Project is a pan-African project that seeks to sequence Africa’s endemic and indigenous plants and animals.
Crystal jellyfish contain glowing proteins that scientists repurpose for an endless array of studies. Weili Li/Moment via Getty Images

From CRISPR to glowing proteins to optogenetics – scientists’ most powerful technologies have been borrowed from nature

Three pioneering technologies have forever altered how researchers do their work and promise to revolutionize medicine, from correcting genetic disorders to treating degenerative brain diseases.
A complete human genome, seen here in pairs of chromosomes, offers a wealth of information, but it is hard connect genetics to traits or disease. HYanWong/Wikimedia Comons

Scientists are on a path to sequencing 1 million human genomes and use big data to unlock genetic secrets

The first full human genome was sequenced 20 years ago. Now, a project is underway to sequence 1 million genomes to better understand the complex relationship between genetics, diversity and disease.
Smaller research teams conduct more disruptive research; a new study could change research funding allocations. Shutterstock

Want disruptive research? Go small instead of big

A new study in Nature finds that large research teams develop recent ideas, while small teams conduct more disruptive and innovative research.
When the Human Genome Project completed its work in 2003, the entire human genome was published in book form. Stephen C. Dickson/Wikimedia

Reading the entire human genome – one long sentence at a time

In 2003 the Human Genome Project “cracked the code of life”, yet parts of our DNA remained unidentified. A new study fills out our genetic blueprint by using a nanotechnology-based technique.
A tumor under the microscope. Cropped from cnicholsonpath/flickr

What Netflix can teach us about treating cancer

Cancer researchers dream of offering personalized treatments to patients. Can they get there using the same math that drives Netflix recommendations?
Pipette tips with reaction mixture to amplify DNA. anyaivanova/www.shutterstock.com

Should we edit out genetic disease?

It seems like a no brainer to edit out genetic disease…until we pause to consider what would be lost.
The Human Genome Project was just the beginning. The Epigenome Roadmap is now telling us how all these genes switch on and off in different parts of the body, and how they go wrong with disease. Tom Purcell/Flickr

Beyond genetics: illuminating the epigenome

There’s still a lot we don’t know about how various genes are switched on and off. But a new project is seeking to shed light on the complex world of epigenetics.
Precision medicine delivers treatment based on the particular variant of the disease by taking the genetic make-up of the ill person into account. Micah Baldwin/Flickr

Precision medicine offers the hope of cures made just for you

Hidden among all the other announcements in last week’s State of the Union address by US President Barack Obama was a promise to fund a new “precision medicine initiative”. The president said it would…

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