Menu Close

Articles on Introduced species

Displaying 1 - 20 of 24 articles

Native bumble bees perform ‘buzz pollination,’ shaking flowers to release protein-rich pollen. A. Westreich

Bee-washing’ hurts bees and misleads consumers

'Bee-washing,' marketing claims that purport to help bees, can diminish the important distinction between a honey bee and native bee.
The Asian honey bee (Apis cerana) has been found in Cairns. It’s just one of the introduced bees buzzing under the radar. Tobias Smith

Aussie scientists need your help keeping track of bees (please)

Bees innocuously buzzing ‘round the birdbath may be a barometer for burgeoning bee invasions.
A bee visits an almond flower – an essential process for almond farmers. Tiago J. G. Fernandez/Wikimedia Commons

The farmer wants a hive: inside the world of renting bees

Many fruits, nuts and other crops rely on bees to pollinate their flowers at just the right time of year. Many farmers rent bees to get the job done at pollination time.
On the prowl in the outback. Hugh McGregor/Arid Recovery

For whom the bell tolls: cats kill more than a million Australian birds every day

For the first time, researchers have estimated the toll taken by feral and pet cats on Australia’s bird life - and the numbers are high enough to push several species towards extinction.
The birds commonly seen in urban backyards of Australia are increasingly introduced species like this house sparrow, sharing a birdbath with a native red-browed finch. Wanda Optland

Is it really so wrong to care for an introduced bird species?

We all know how vital it is for our native bird species to thrive. But what if the only birds that visit your garden are introduced “pest” species? Many people feel these birds deserve some love too.
The American Cockroach, one of the most common species found in your home. Cockroach image from www.shutterstock.com

Hidden housemates: cockroaches

There are over 5,000 species of cockroach, but fortunately only a few have chosen to live with us.
True Australians: hard workers, quiet achievers and generally underappreciated labourers.

Australia: riding on the insect’s back

Insects are largely hidden from view or maligned unfairly, but they make a tremendous contribution to the Australian economy.
A glimpse of wild brumbies in the Snowy Mountains. Michael Tristram/Flickr

The grim story of the Snowy Mountains’ cannibal horses

When you think of horses in the Australia high country, you might imagine noble brumbies galloping out from snowgums across grassy peaks, tails and manes trailing like streamers. But on a recent trip to…

Top contributors

More