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More than half of the top 250 U.S. colleges and universities offer legacy admissions. Paul Marotta / Getty Images

Why do colleges use legacy admissions? 5 questions answered

Elite universities have been giving special preference to children of prior graduates for more than a century. Has the time come for that practice to stop? A sociologist weighs in.
Students at Ecole Polytechnique. Their alumni network is one of the most powerful and may lead some to the top of a large French company. J. Barande/École Polytechnique

France’s elite schools and their alumni networks: a flaw in the governance of French companies

When the directors of a company are graduates of the same school as the executive, their ability to hold the executive accountable for his or her decisions becomes compromised.
Over 5,000 student-athletes were directly affected by a recent wave of shutdowns of intercollegiate sports teams. Frank Jansky/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

Colleges are eliminating sports teams – and runners and golfers are paying more of a price than football or basketball players

Shutting down sports teams can save schools millions of dollars but create longer-term challenges for enrollment, fundraising and campus life.
Robert F. Smith speaks onstage during the 2019 Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights Ripple Of Hope Awards on Dec. 12, 2018, in New York City. Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights

Why graduates of elite universities dominate the Time 100 – and what it means for the rest of us

For the past two decades graduates of America's most selective universities have dominated the Time 100 list. Will that always be the case?
William ‘Rick’ Singer founder of the Edge College & Career Network, pleaded guilty to charges in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal. AP Photo/Steven Senne

Why rich parents are more likely to be unethical

An expert explains the many reasons why people behave in an unethical manner and what research shows on why the wealthy have a need to maintain their higher status.
Could a random admissions process help spare universities from legal trouble and save time and money? Adam Alagna/www.shutterstock.com

Why elite colleges should use a lottery to admit students

Colleges and universities are often criticized for how they admit students from diverse groups. A college admissions scholar suggests an admissions lottery could help make the process more fair.
T.M. Landry College Prep co-founders Tracey and Michael Landry have stepped down from the school’s board as authorities investigate a wide range of allegations against the school, from academic fraud to physical abuse. T.M. Landry College Prep

How T.M. Landry College Prep failed black families

T.M. Landry College Prep, facing allegations of abuse, is known for getting students from poor backgrounds into Ivy League schools. An education scholar says the school’s focus was misplaced.
Black power militant H. Rap Brown and Stokely Carmichael (right) appeared at a sit-in protest at Columbia University in New York City on April 26, 1968. AP

1968 protests at Columbia University called attention to ‘Gym Crow’ and got worldwide attention

The 1968 protests at Columbia University led the institution to abandon a gym project that residents considered racist and cut off its defense work – and generated worldwide attention in the process.
More and more students at Harvard are examining their admission files to try to understand how they got in. The U.S. government is also plans to examine the files as part of a discrimination case filed by 63 Asian- American groups. Shutterstock.com

You’re not going to get accepted into a top university on merit alone

Students and government officials alike hope Harvard’s admission files will yield clues about who gets in and why, but a Harvard researcher says their efforts will be in vain.
Is the California Dream still alive and well? Ivan Aleshin/shutterstock.com

Imagining the ‘California Dream’

Millions of people have imagined California, but only one man was its historian.
Mark Zuckerberg is, quite famously, a college dropout. But his case is the exception – not the rule. AP Photo/Paul Sakuma

The myth of the college dropout

While the media glamorizes famous college dropouts like Mark Zuckerberg and Bill Gates, the reality is that most successful people in the U.S. went to – and finished – college.
Universities are increasingly using “aptitude” and “character” tests to admit more students. Test image from www.shutterstock.com

Can aptitude tests pick the ‘right’ students for university?

Since 2007, the Australian government has been evaluating a pilot aptitude test for future university students. The test is meant to help universities select students who might have the ability to undertake…

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