Menu Close

Articles on Legal system

Displaying 1 - 20 of 59 articles

People protest against the white supremacist movement and racism outside the United States consulate in Toronto in August 2017 after racism-fuelled violence in Charlottesville, Va. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Terrorism laws target racism, but what about racism in the legal system?

Critics of new terrorism laws argue they do not necessarily eradicate hate-fuelled violence — and they could make structural and institutional violence seem more palatable.
Felicity Huffman leaves federal court with her husband William H. Macy, left, and her brother Moore Huffman Jr. rear center, after she was sentenced in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal, Sept. 13, 2019, in Boston. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer

Felicity Huffman: White is the colour of remorse

The fallout from the Huffman case has been intense, with much anger centered on the light punishment meted out to a white A-list celebrity versus the excessive charges levelled at Black defendants.
An exterior view of the Indonesian Constitusional Court building in Jakarta. Bagus Indahono/EPA

Prabowo challenges Indonesia’s poll result at Constitutional Court but doubts its impartiality. New research confirms the court’s fairness

Providing the first empirical analysis of the court’s performance in high-profile cases between 2004 and 2016, our research indicates that its independence from the government remains intact.
George Pell’s lawyer, Robert Richter, said he will appeal the guilty verdict. DAVID CROSLING/AAP Image

How an appeal could uphold or overturn George Pell’s conviction

George Pell’s conviction has opened a rift in Australian society, with many people questioning the guilty verdict. Pell’s lawyer has said he will appeal. On what grounds could he do that?
A 69-year-old man is in jail for encouraging his wife to commit suicide so he could get the $1.4 million from her life insurance policies.

Encouraging suicide or committing manslaughter?

A 69-year-old man is in jail for encouraging his wife to suicide but some have wondered why he wasn’t charged with a more serious offence.
Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh used baseball to explain his judicial philosophy during his Senate confirmation hearing. Reuters/Alex Wroblewski

Kavanaugh’s ‘judge as umpire’ metaphor sounds neutral but it’s deeply conservative

Kavanaugh thinks judges ‘must be an umpire – a neutral and impartial arbiter.’ So does Chief Justice Roberts. But more liberal jurists believe that the application of the law is inherently subjective.

Top contributors

More