Articles on Living Longer 2020

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Home health worker Mass Joof adjusts the pillow for Eric McGuire in Franklin, Mass., on March 25, 2020. Photo by John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

How coronavirus could forever change home health care, leaving vulnerable older adults without care and overburdening caregivers

Home health care is a much trickier question after COVID-19, and that becomes an issue for millions of older people who rely on home health care, as well as the workers who care for them.
Mary-Lou McCullagh, 83, inside her Ventura, California home, in isolation because of COVID-19. She and her husband Bob, 84, greet the little boy who lives across the street. Getty Images / Brent Stirton

Out with the old: Coronavirus highlights why we need new names for aging

What's in a word? Plenty, when it comes to the choices we use to describe people over 60. Stigma against older people that has been evident during the COVID-19 pandemic shows why it's time to change.
Chuck Sedlacek, a patient at the Life Care Center in Kirkland, Washington, smiles through a window at his children. Chuck has tested positive for the coronavirus. Getty Images / Karen Ducey

Preventing COVID-19 from decimating nursing home residents requires spending money and improving infection control

Nursing homes in the U.S. are not ready to care for coronavirus patients. Things need to change -- fast.
Blacks have twice the incidence rates for Alzheimer’s as whites. Getty Images / Science Photo Library

Blacks are at higher risk for Alzheimer’s, but why?

Blacks are at higher risk for many diseases. This is partly due to poverty, discrimination and lack of access to care. But there may be something different about the higher rates of Alzheimer's.

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