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Articles on Living Longer 2020

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The older you get, the more slowly you heal, and there are a number of reasons why. Westend61 via Getty Images

Why do older people heal more slowly?

Healing is a complicated process. As people age, higher rates of disease and the fact that old cells lose the ability to divide slow this process down.
Working out strengthens more than just your muscles – it strengthens your immune system, too. SelectStock/E+ via Getty Images

These at-home exercises can help older people boost their immune system and overall health in the age of COVID-19

Older adults, who are at a higher risk for COVID-19 complications, can strengthen their immune systems by exercising.
Tom Seaver at Shea Stadium in Flushing, N.Y. in 1969, when he led the once ‘Lovable Losers’ to the World Series. The Mets won, and many cited Seaver’s pitching mastery and leadership. Focus On Sport/Getty Images

Tom Seaver, like Robin Williams, had Lewy body dementia, but what is this strange illness? A neurologist explains

A pitcher known for his mental game as well as his physical prowess, Tom Seaver died this week from Lewy body dementia. A doctor explains this troubling form of dementia.
In healthy older people, loneliness has a pattern of stress response similar to that of people who are under chronic stress. Justin Paget via Getty Images

The loneliness of social isolation can affect your brain and raise dementia risk in older adults

The social isolation older adults are experiencing as they try to stay safe from the coronavirus pandemic is raising new mental health risks, but people can take steps to protect themselves.
Dana Gasby, left, interacts with her mother B. Smith in their East Hampton home on Long Island, New York, on Wednesday, January 9, 2019. B. Smith has Alzheimer’s Disease. Karten Moran for The Washington Post via Getty Images

The importance of blood tests for Alzheimer’s: 2 neuroscientists explain the recent findings

A blood test to detect Alzheimer's disease in people who have symptoms and even those who don't has been shown to work. Scientists still need to improve its accuracy rate to almost 100%, however.
Home health worker Mass Joof adjusts the pillow for Eric McGuire in Franklin, Mass., on March 25, 2020. Photo by John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

How coronavirus could forever change home health care, leaving vulnerable older adults without care and overburdening caregivers

Home health care is a much trickier question after COVID-19, and that becomes an issue for millions of older people who rely on home health care, as well as the workers who care for them.
Mary-Lou McCullagh, 83, inside her Ventura, California home, in isolation because of COVID-19. She and her husband Bob, 84, greet the little boy who lives across the street. Getty Images / Brent Stirton

Out with the old: Coronavirus highlights why we need new names for aging

What's in a word? Plenty, when it comes to the choices we use to describe people over 60. Stigma against older people that has been evident during the COVID-19 pandemic shows why it's time to change.
Chuck Sedlacek, a patient at the Life Care Center in Kirkland, Washington, smiles through a window at his children. Chuck has tested positive for the coronavirus. Getty Images / Karen Ducey

Preventing COVID-19 from decimating nursing home residents requires spending money and improving infection control

Nursing homes in the U.S. are not ready to care for coronavirus patients. Things need to change -- fast.
Blacks have twice the incidence rates for Alzheimer’s as whites. Getty Images / Science Photo Library

Blacks are at higher risk for Alzheimer’s, but why?

Blacks are at higher risk for many diseases. This is partly due to poverty, discrimination and lack of access to care. But there may be something different about the higher rates of Alzheimer's.

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