Articles on Mental illness

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One in three 18 to 25 year olds reported feeling lonely three or more times in the past week. Todd Diemer

1 in 3 young adults is lonely – and it affects their mental health

Loneliness is often triggered by significant life events, and young people have these in abundance. But the solution isn't as simple as joining a group or trying harder to make friends.
Self-injury is associated with underlying psychological distress, and increased suicide risk. But people who self-injure aren’t doing it to end their life.

It’s not only teenage girls, and it’s rarely attention-seeking: debunking the myths around self-injury

Stigma can make people who self-injure reluctant to disclose their experiences and seek help. One way to combat the stigma is to debunk some of the most common myths that surround self-injury.
President Trump prayed with two students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Feb. 21, 2018 before a discussion on gun violence. On Sept. 9, 2019, he floated an idea to monitor people with mental illness. Carolyn Kaster/AP Photo

A plan to monitor the mentally ill? History of mental illness and stigma provides insights

To understand the panic about mass shootings and whether mental illness plays a role, it is important to look to the past. A history of stigma and fear contributes to people blaming mental illness.
Many people exit the mental healthcare system into homelessness, only to return repeatedly to hospital-based care, and sometimes the prison system. Shutterstock

From hospital to homeless: Victoria’s mental health system fails the most vulnerable

Without a place to live it is nearly impossible to take care of your mental health needs.The upcoming Royal Commission should recognise the connection between stable housing and mental health.
Socioeconomic disadvantage is a known risk factor for mental illness. From shutterstock.com

When it’s easier to get meds than therapy: how poverty makes it hard to escape mental illness

In Australia, the highest rates of mental illness can be found in the poorest sections of society. But poor people with mental disorders often struggle to access the care they need.
In today’s digital age, we’re losing the ability to switch off from our work. From shutterstock.com

Are you burnt out at work? Ask yourself these 4 questions

Has anyone close to you asked you to cut down on your work? Do you feel guilty that you're not spending enough time with your friends, family or even yourself? It might be time for change.
Research has shown psychedelic drugs can have a positive effect on a range of mental health conditions, but there are side effects. From shutterstock.com

Psychedelics to treat mental illness? Australian researchers are giving it a go

Australia is about to start its first trial of psychedelic drugs for the treatment of anxiety and depression. If the results are positive, this could transform the way we treat mental illness.
A man walks in a back alley in Vancouver’s downtown eastside, February 2019. More people fatally overdosed in British Columbia last year compared with 2017 despite efforts to combat the province’s public health emergency. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

The opioid crisis is not about pain

A policy response focused on reducing prescription opioids will not resolve North America's opioid crisis. And it is hurting many adults who live with otherwise unbearable chronic pain.
Treating somebody at risk of developing a mental health disorder may improve their outcomes later on. Jeremy Perkins/Unsplash

For people at risk of mental illness, having access to treatment early can help

Early intervention is a proven way to address the burden of mental ill health. We just need to better understand who is at risk of developing a mental disorder – and how best to treat them.
Currently only half of people with depression access potentially adequate treatment, according to one research study. Digital devices could help. (Unsplash/boudewijn huysmans)

The future of psychiatry promises to be digital – from apps that track your mood to smartphone therapy

Using smartphones and wearable devices to identify mental health symptoms and deliver psychotherapy will allow more people to access quality care, according to one psychiatrist.
Research shows we all hold negative stereotypes; once we accept this, we can start to making positive change. Shutterstock

Let’s stop blaming ourselves for stigmatizing mental health

Awareness campaigns can only go so far to stopping the stigmatization of mental health. Change occurs once we stop shaming ourselves and others for our bias.

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