Articles on Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS)

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Brazilian scientist working on a vaccine at the Immunology laboratory of the Heart Institute (Incor) of the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Sao Paulo. Sebastiao Moreira/EPA

Coronavirus vaccine: reasons to be optimistic

We don't have vaccines for the Sars, Mers or the common cold. But that doesn't mean scientists won't crack it this time.
South Africans practise social distancing while they queue outside a supermarket in Hillbrow, Johannesburg during the country’s lockdown. Photo by Marco Longari/AFP via Getty Images

South Africa needs a post-lockdown strategy that emulates South Korea

South Africa cannot afford to embark on a strategy of extended periodic lockdowns. It needs to shift to mass testing and contact tracing.
A horseshoe bat chasing a moth. Horseshoe bats were the source of SARS. Scientists consider bats to be a possible source of coronavirus. DE AGOSTINI PICTURE LIBRARY / Contributor

A clue to stopping coronavirus: Knowing how viruses adapt from animals to humans

Some of the world's worst diseases have come from animals. Bats, cows, camels and horses have all contributed. Now, scientists are working to know which animal introduced the new coronavirus.
A man wearing a surgical mask makes a child wear one outside a hospital where a student who had been in Wuhan is kept in isolation in Thrissur, Kerala state, India. AP Photo

WHO declares global health emergency over coronavirus: 4 questions answered

The World Health Organization declared the new coronavirus to be a public health emergency on Jan. 30, 2020. Does the action really change anything? An expert answers four questions.
Whether by biology or behavior, some people in the crowd will transmit coronavirus to more than the average number of others. AP Photo/Kin Cheung

What is a super spreader? An infectious disease expert explains

The novel coronavirus spreading outward from Wuhan, China, will get an assist from a subset of infected people who transmit it to many others.
A worker in Wuhan, China removes biomedical waste from the Wuhan Medical Treatment Center, where many patients of the coronavirus have been treated, on Jan. 22, 2020. AP Photo/Dake Kang

Are you in danger of catching the coronavirus? 5 questions answered

The coronavirus that has sickened hundreds in Wuhan, China, has worried health officials and other humans across the globe. Should people in the US worry?
Health authorities are worried because they don’t know how dangerous this strain of coronavirus could be. Facundo Arrizaba BALAGA

Should we be worried about the new Wuhan coronavirus?

The virus seems to spread like any other respiratory illness – through coughs and sneezes, or contact with contaminated surfaces. Here's what we know about it so far.
Bats are the only mammals capable of true flight. Scientists believe flight may influence their immune responses to coronoviruses, which cause fatal diseases such as SARS and MERS in humans. (Shutterstock)

Can bats help humans survive the next pandemic?

Scientific studies show that bats may carry "coronoviruses" causing SARS and MERS - without showing symptoms of disease. Could the bat immune system be key to human survival in future pandemics?

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