Articles on Nudges

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Governments can use nudges to influence our choices. Shutterstock

Speaking with: law professor Cass Sunstein, on why behavioural science is always nudging us

Law professor Cass Sunstein, on why behavioural science is always nudging us. The Conversation20.5 MB (download)
Governments and businesses are using "nudges" to influence our choices, but how? On this podcast episode, Cass Sunstein, a Harvard professor who wrote the book on nudges, unpacks behavioural science.
Your finger may hover, but it’s hard get rid of it once and for all. ymgerman/Shutterstock.com

Why it’s so hard to #DeleteFacebook: Constant psychological boosts keep you hooked

Social media provide shortcuts to things we yearn for, like connection and validation. Media effects scholars explain the psychological benefits we get from Facebook that make it so hard to quit.
Richard Thaler, laureate in economics, receives his Nobel in Stockholm in December. TT News Agency/Jonas Ekstromer via Reuters

Behavioral economics finally goes mainstream: 4 essential reads

After two Nobel prize wins for behavioral economists, the burgeoning field has demonstrated its importance in shaping effective economic and government policy.
A man taking stairs at Washington-Dulles International Airport in 2013. Wikimedia Commons

One step at a time: Simple nudges can increase lifestyle physical activity

Dropping old, bad habits is hard, but starting new, good ones may not be so difficult. Or so a recent study suggests. Read how a simple sign at an airport made a difference.
A product’s calorie label is a common form of nudging behavior. AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Do people like government ‘nudges’? Study says: Yes

Government initiatives to prod people to make better decisions got a lot of attention after Richard Thaler won a Nobel in economics for his working on nudging.
In the wrong hands, ‘nudges’ can be used in nefarious ways. Marionette strings via www.shutterstock.com

Can Trump resist the power of behavioral science’s dark side?

Dozens of governments have been using the insights from the burgeoning field to 'nudge' citizens in ways that improve their well-being. But some worry Trump might use it for less altruistic ends.

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