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Articles on Perception

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Some areas wouldn’t see immediate effects, and there could be serious consequences. Buda Mendes/Getty Images

Solar geoengineering might work, but local temperatures could keep rising for years

Injecting reflective particles into the atmosphere won’t immediately cool the entire planet. A new study shows how parts of the US, China and Europe might still see temperatures rising a decade later.
Undergraduate students at the University of Nebraska Omaha collaborate on a group assignment for a STEM course. Derrick Nero, University of Nebraska Omaha

Women are better at statistics than they think

Female statistics students had higher final exam grades than their male peers, even though they had less confidence in their statistics abilities at the start of the semester.
Some people are inherently better at tasks like reading X-rays. SDI Productions/E+ via Getty Images

People vary a lot in how well they recognize, match or categorize the things they see – researchers attribute this skill to an ability they call ‘o’

To achieve perceptual expertise, you may need more than smarts and hard work. Research suggests there’s a general ability that may help you succeed in jobs that depend on perceptual decisions.
David Julius, one of the two recipients of the 2021 medicine Nobel Prize, used the active component in chile peppers to study how the brain senses heat. Anton Eine/EyeEm via Getty Images

The 2021 Nobel Prize for medicine helps unravel mysteries about how the body senses temperature and pressure

The joint award recognizes the long road to deciphering the biology behind the brain’s ability to sense its surroundings – work that paves the way for a number of medical and biological breakthroughs.
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu gives a briefing at the Hakirya military base in Tel Aviv on May 19, 2021. Sebastian Scheiner/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

As trust between Israeli Jews and Arabs reaches new lows, Netanyahu rises again

There are two splits in public opinion about the current Israel-Palestine violence, though everyone has the same set of facts. A cognitive psychologist explains how this can happen.
It’s disconcerting to think the way two people perceive the world might be totally different. Mads Perch/Stone via Getty Images

Do you see red like I see red?

Neuroscientists tackling the age-old question of whether perceptions of color hold from one person to the next are coming up with some interesting answers.
The Orange Problem, 2019, Acrylic on panel, 72 x 72 cm. © Robert Pepperell 2019. The author

Art, science and the paradoxes of perception

When we look at art we may not all see the same thing. It all depends on what happens in our brains.

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