Articles on Brain

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Red quantum dots glow inside a rat brain cell. Nanoscale Advances, 2019, 1, 3424 - 3442

Quantum dots that light up TVs could be used for brain research

These tiny nanoparticles might provide a new way to see what's happening in the brain and even deliver treatments to specific cells – if researchers figure out how to use them safely and effectively.
Ian West/PA Wire/PA Images

Why do people believe in curses?

From Strictly Come Dancing to the Tour de France 'curses' have rational explanations. Here, psychologists discuss why belief in them persists.
Existing BMIs focus on restoring function for people with mobility or communication issues. UPMC/Pitt Health Sciences

Brain-machine interfaces are getting better and better – and Neuralink’s new brain implant pushes the pace

BMIs like the ones Neuralink is working on are already used in laboratories around the world as assistive technologies. But melding your mind with an AI is probably not happening anytime soon.
To perform a sequence of actions, our brains need to prepare and queue them in the correct order. AYAakovlev/Shutterstock

How the brain prepares for movement and actions

Knowing how the brain prepares for sequences of movements can help us better understand disorders such as stuttering and dyspraxia.
Here’s what’s happening in your body if you’re feeling faint. William Moss/Shutterstock.com

Why do people faint?

Most of the time, different parts of your nervous system work in balance. But sometimes things can get out of whack – and that's when you might end up experiencing what medics call syncope.
Toronto Maple Leafs’ goaltender Frederik Andersen is scored on by Montreal Canadiens’ Andrew Shaw during second period NHL hockey action in Montreal in April. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

From the penalty box to the ballot box, our brains are wired for tribalism

Our neural hardware responds differently when we perceive people to be on "our team." This hard-wiring allows for both positive and negative biases.

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