Articles on Brain

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People exposed to low levels of sunlight are more likely to have MS than those who live in warm climates. chuttersnap

What causes multiple sclerosis? What we know, don’t know and suspect

Young women are disproportionately affected by multiple sclerosis, a disease where the body attacks the brain, scrambling communication to the rest of the body. Here's what we know about the causes.
People with dementia experience a range of psychological symptoms and behaviour changes. From shutterstock.com

Why people with dementia don’t all behave the same

With an ageing population, dementia is becoming more and more prevalent. But what does dementia actually do to the brain to cause changes in behaviour?
Montreal Alouettes quarterback Johnny Manziel is tackled by the Ottawa Redblacks in Ottawa on Aug. 11, 2018. Manziel was subsequently placed under the CFL concussion protocol. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang)

How concussion stresses the heart to protect the brain

Recent research shows that the heart is affected when the head takes a blow, in sports-related concussion.
The fashion advice is generally to tighten ties so they’re tight but not too tight. from www.shutterstock.com

Research Check: do neckties reduce blood supply to the brain?

Wearing a tie that causes slight discomfort can reduce blood flow to the brain by 7.5%, but the reduction is unlikely to cause any physical symptoms, which generally begin at a reduction of 10%.
Many board games strengthen the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of the brains of players. This results in improved cognitive functions such as IQ, memory, information retention and problem-solving. (Shutterstock)

Play games with your kids this summer to boost their brains

From dyslexia, to dementia to schizophrenia, there is evidence that playing games can help, while boosting family connections and emotional wellbeing.
What are your in-groups and out-groups? ksenia_bravo/Shutterstock.com

Why our brains see the world as ‘us’ versus ‘them’

Our neural circuits lead us to find comfort in those like us and unease with those who differ, resulting in a battle between reward and distrust. But these brain connections aren't the end of the story.
Violence in communities may have an additional unseen victim: young peoples’ developing brains. Zoran Karapancev/Shutterstock.com

Living with neighborhood violence may shape teens’ brains

Experiencing and witnessing violence in their communities can lead to emotional, social and cognitive problems for kids. A new study shows it affects how their developing brains grow, as well.

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