Articles on Brain

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We’re still learning about the human brain. SpeedKingz/Shutterstock

Five amazing facts about your brain

Even though the brain controls virtually everything we do, we often know very little about it.
Pedestrians wear protective masks as they walk in Toronto in late January 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Coronavirus fears: Should we take a deep breath?

We have a strong tendency to overreact emotionally and underreact behaviourally to news of infectious diseases.
Just a few millimeters across, organoids are clumps of cells that resemble the brain. Madeline Andrews, Arnold Kriegstein's lab, UCSF

Brain organoids help neuroscientists understand brain development, but aren’t perfect matches for real brains

Brain organoids are tiny models that neuroscientists use to learn more about how the brain grows and works. But new research finds important differences between the model and the real thing.
Looking out the window instead might stop you feeling sick, but that doesn’t work for everyone. Vadiar/Shutterstock

Curious Kids: why does reading in the back seat make you feel sick?

When you read in the back seat of the car, your eyes tell your brain you're still. But your ears can sense you're moving. Your eyes and ears are having an argument that your brain is trying to settle.
Neurostimulation is rife with potential and pitfalls. Metamorworks/Shutterstock

Stimulus package: brain stimulation holds huge promise, but is critically under-regulated

From dementia to depression to drug addiction, artificial brain stimulation has been hailed as a landmark medical technology for the future. But safeguards are needed if we want the benefits without the risks.
With the ubiquity and availability of devices connected to the internet, access to pornography is easier than it has ever been. (Charles/Unsplash)

Watching pornography rewires the brain to a more juvenile state

Cognitive neuroscience finds that regular consumption of pornography affects the centres of the brain responsible for will power, impulse control and morality.
Those smiles probably aren’t thanks to tryptophan. Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock.com

Turning to turkey’s tryptophan to boost mood? Not so fast

Tryptophan, found in food, is an important ingredient in the neurotransmitter serotonin. But is that enough to support it as a possible mood booster? The research is decidedly mixed.

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