Menu Close

Articles on Brain

Displaying 1 - 20 of 487 articles

Concussion doesn’t just happen in sports or only in teens and young adults; it affects people of all ages and backgrounds. (Shutterstock)

Concussion is more than sports injuries: Who’s at risk and how Canadian researchers are seeking better diagnostics and treatments

Canadian researchers are exploring unanswered questions about concussion: How to diagnose it accurately and quickly, how to predict outcomes and promote recovery, and how to prevent it altogether.
The U.S. BRAIN Initiative seeks to elucidate the connection between brain structure and function. Science Photo Library - PASIEKA/Brand X Pictures via Getty Images

Illuminating the brain one neuron and synapse at a time – 5 essential reads about how researchers are using new tools to map its structure and function

From figuring out where memories are stored to how sensory information translates to behavior, new technologies are helping neuroscientists better understand how the brain works.
Epilepsy is characterized by spontaneous and recurrent seizures, often triggered by stress or visual stimuli. (Shutterstock)

What epilepsy teaches us about diversity and resilience

Our team studied the activity of neurons in people with epilepsy. Neurons in the brain regions responsible for triggering seizures were much less diverse.
Naked molerats have evolved mechanisms to protect the brain from the effects of low oxygen. (Shutterstock)

Naked mole rats, frogs and other animals may hold the secrets to preventing brain injury

Some animals use microRNA to protect the brain from various stressors. Understanding how they do this and applying it to humans has potential for revolutionary treatments.
New research indicates that rhesus monkeys show interoception – the ability to sense physiological processes like their own heartbeats. Matthew Verdolivo/UC Davis IET Academic Technology Services

Monkeys can sense their own heartbeats, an ability tied to mental health, consciousness and memory in humans

Researchers used a test designed for babies to show that rhesus monkeys can sense their own heartbeats. The finding opens up important paths of research into consciousness and mental health issues.
The human brain isn’t built to understand large numbers. OsakaWayne Studios/Moment via Getty Images

Brains are bad at big numbers, making it impossible to grasp what a million COVID-19 deaths really means

The brain can count small numbers or compare large ones. But it struggles to understand the value of a single large number. This fact may be influencing how people react to numbers about the pandemic.

Top contributors

More