Menu Close

Articles on Neurology

Displaying 1 - 20 of 86 articles

People can have several thousand thoughts per day, many of which can be classified as spontaneous or involuntary. (Shutterstock)

Where our thoughts come from: How microemotions affect spontaneous thought

Emotions play a key role in many types of spontaneous thoughts. Even microemotions — which are often fleeting and unconscious — can affect thoughts and influence attention.
A new brain-imaging study finds that participants who had even mild COVID-19 showed an average reduction in whole brain sizes. Kirstypargeter/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Even mild cases of COVID-19 can leave a mark on the brain, such as reductions in gray matter – a neuroscientist explains emerging research

New research offers insights into the brain after COVID-19 that may have implications for our understanding of long COVID-19 and how the disease affects our senses of taste and smell.
An estimated 69 million people worldwide experience a traumatic brain injury every year. Iaremenko/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Blocking an immune system molecule in mice may help prevent long-term disabilities after traumatic brain injury

The molecule C1q has both protective and detrimental effects after traumatic brain injury. Blocking it after injury in mice restored normal brain rhythms during sleep and prevented epileptic spikes.
In late 2016, people working and living in the embassy district of Havana, including at the U.S. Embassy seen here, began hearing strange sounds before getting sick. AP Photo/Desmond Boylan

Havana syndrome fits the pattern of psychosomatic illness – but that doesn’t mean the symptoms aren’t real

Havana syndrome has spread to government officials around the world and stumped doctors for years. Despite news of mysterious attacks, evidence suggests mass psychogenic illness may be the true cause.
The new findings, although preliminary, are raising concerns about the potential long-term effects of COVID-19. Yuichiro Chino via Getty Images

Preliminary research finds that even mild cases of COVID-19 leave a mark on the brain – but it’s not yet clear how long it lasts

Reduced brain volume in people who have experienced COVID-19 resembles brain changes typically seen in older adults. The implications of these findings are not yet clear.
People suffering from long-term effects of COVID-19 face uncertainty about the nature of their symptoms and how long they might last. Halfpoint Images/Moment via Getty Images

Deciphering the symptoms of long COVID-19 is slow and painstaking – for both sufferers and their physicians

Researchers are piecing together clues to better understand the puzzling array of symptoms in those who never seem to fully recover from COVID-19.

Top contributors

More