Articles on Predators

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It’s OK, I’m a filter feeder: Whale shark off Indonesia. Marcel Ekkel/Flickr

Shark Week looms, but don’t panic

Media coverage of sharks often exaggerates risks to people, but more than 500 shark species have never been known to attack humans, and there's lots to learn about them.
Artistic view of the evolution of elephants. From left to right, Moeritherium (30 million years old), Deinotherium (5 million years old) and a modern African elephant. Alex Bernardini (Simplex Paléo) and Sophie Vrard (Creaphi).

How did elephants evolve such a large brain? Climate change is part of the answer

A shift in climate, along with other environmental disruptions and the invasion of competitors and new predators all likely played an important role in reshaping ancient elephants' brains.
Eastern quolls have been introduced in Booderee Nation Park as part of a rewilding project. Oisin Sweeney

We can ‘rewild’ swathes of Australia by focusing on what makes it unique

Rewilding is gaining popularity around the world, as a means to restore ecosystems to their ancient state. But just like Vegemite, Australian rewilding projects need to have a unique flavour.
The dingo, Australia’s largest mammalian carnivore, has a broad diet that varies across the continent. Judy Dunlop

Dingo dinners: what’s on the menu for Australia’s top predator?

A survey of 32,000 samples of dingo droppings and stomach contents reveal that this predator's appetite is as wide-ranging as Australia's landscapes. But medium and large mammals are top of the menu.
Watch out for these tiny tough guys. Roy L. Caldwell, Department of Integrative Biology, UC Berkeley (For use only with this article)

A cooler ocean predator than sharks? Consider the mantis shrimps

With superpowers other animals can only dream of, these crustaceans challenge sharks for the title of most amazing predator in the sea.
Dingoes are usually solitary, but can forage in groups near human settlements where food is abundant. Klaasmer/Wikimedia Commons

Why do dingoes attack people, and how can we prevent it?

An attack on a WA mine worker has highlighted the danger of wild dingoes, particularly when attracted by humans' food - one of the factors that can make an attack by wild predators much more likely.
Black tip sharks swim with tropical fish in a lagoon in French Polynesia. (Shutterstock)

Killing sharks, wolves and other top predators won’t solve conflicts

When humans have conflicts with wildlife, the first reaction is often to cull them. But there's little evidence to show that it works, and removing predators can even backfire and make things worse.
Like many migratory songbirds, tree swallows are experiencing population declines in parts of their breeding range. Julia Baak

Birds wearing backpacks trace a path to conservation

Effective conservation of migratory songbirds requires an understanding of how populations are connected between seasons. The challenge is being able to track individuals throughout the entire year.
White sharks’ ability to stay warm in cold water makes them efficient long-range hunters. Denice Askebrink

Why do shark bites seem to be more deadly in Australia than elsewhere?

Fatal shark bites are very rare. But the stats do suggest that the likelihood of an attack proving fatal is higher in Australia - probably because our waters are home to the "big three" dangerous species.

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