Menu Close

Articles on Sedentary behaviour

Displaying all articles

Shutterstock

Aussie kids are some of the least active in the world. We developed a cheap school program that gets results

Governments spend millions to try to get kids moving but these interventions may be short-lived, or only benefit a group of kids. Our program is cost-effective and can work long term.
Everyday environments and activities, from transportation to screen time to eating, are tailored nearly exclusively to prolonged sitting. (Canva/Unsplash/Pixabay)

Too much sitting is bad for you — but some types are better than others

Too much time sitting is linked to health risks, and also to lower quality of life. But in some contexts, such as reading, playing an instrument or socializing, sitting had positive associations.
Come school holidays, your school-aged kids are more likely to spend longer on their screens than they do in term time. Here’s how to get them outside and active, with a bit of planning. from www.shutterstock.com

4 ways to get your kids off the couch these summer holidays

The average Australian school kid spends more time watching TV or gaming and less time being active over their summer holidays. Could more chores be the answer?
Some Nordic school kids are doing an average of two to three hours of physical activity a week. Does Australia need to lift its game? CAHPER/Sangudo/Flickr

Look up north. Here’s how Aussie kids can move more at school, Nordic style

Specialist teachers and hours of compulsory physical education a week are keeping Nordic school children moving. When it comes to physical activity, Australia could do better.
Secondary school students typically spend less time doing physical activity than they did in primary school. www.shutterstock.com

Adapting to secondary school: why the physical environment is important too

The transition from primary to secondary school can be tough for children socially and emotionally. Students also do less physical activity in secondary school, and need help with this transition too.
When we sit, we accumulate calories and excess fat which can cause obesity, diabetes, cancer, heart disease and death. The solution may be as simple as counting. (Shutterstock)

How to stop sitting yourself to death

If you sit all day at work, then cancer, diabetes, heart disease and death are the likely outcomes. A cardiologist explains how the simple act of counting can reverse this evolutionary trend.

Top contributors

More