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Articles on Sitting

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Everyday environments and activities, from transportation to screen time to eating, are tailored nearly exclusively to prolonged sitting. (Canva/Unsplash/Pixabay)

Too much sitting is bad for you — but some types are better than others

Too much time sitting is linked to health risks, and also to lower quality of life. But in some contexts, such as reading, playing an instrument or socializing, sitting had positive associations.
from www.shutterstock.com

Do men really take longer to poo?

If you believe the memes, men spend ages in the toilet. But they’re not always pooing. Here’s what they’re really doing.
Since stay-at-home orders were issued, there has been an upsurge in Netflix and app use, indicating that people may be spending more time at sedentary actives. Pixabay

5 tips to get you off the sofa — because sitting more during COVID-19 is hurting your health

Even if you exercise, sitting too much is linked to health risks from anxiety to diabetes. But this ‘invisible’ behaviour may pervade our lives even more under COVID-19 stay-at-home guidelines.
Standing up when doing routine things such as talking on the phone can reduce the amount of time a person sits. YoloStock/Shutterstock.com

Can sitting less decrease your risk of heart disease?

Sitting has been maligned in recent years for its role in obesity and diabetes. Now, a recent study in older women suggests that sedentary behavior may also increase heart disease risk.
Secondary school students typically spend less time doing physical activity than they did in primary school. www.shutterstock.com

Adapting to secondary school: why the physical environment is important too

The transition from primary to secondary school can be tough for children socially and emotionally. Students also do less physical activity in secondary school, and need help with this transition too.
When we sit, we accumulate calories and excess fat which can cause obesity, diabetes, cancer, heart disease and death. The solution may be as simple as counting. (Shutterstock)

How to stop sitting yourself to death

If you sit all day at work, then cancer, diabetes, heart disease and death are the likely outcomes. A cardiologist explains how the simple act of counting can reverse this evolutionary trend.
While office workers often worry they sit too long while on the job, research suggests standing at work increases the risk of heart disease. (Shutterstock)

Standing too much at work can double your risk of heart disease

Annoyed you don’t have a sit-stand desk? Spare a thought for those workers who have to stand all day: Standing may double the risk of heart disease.
Sitting down at work all day may not be so bad for you after all. How did we get it so wrong? from www.shutterstock.com

Why sitting is not the ‘new smoking’

New research shows not all sitting is bad for our health, so long as you’re active at other times of the day.
Desk-based office workers should spend at least two hours of their working day standing or moving. Tim Caynes/Flickr

Office workers, stand up from your desk for two hours a day

We’ve known for some time that too much sitting increases your risk of diabetes and heart disease. But until now it’s been unclear how much standing during the work day may counter this risk.

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