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The Port of Savannah used to export cotton picked by enslaved laborers and brought from Alabama to Georgia on slave-built railways. Cotton is still a top product processed through this port. Joe Sohm/Visions of America/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Slave-built infrastructure still creates wealth in US, suggesting reparations should cover past harms and current value of slavery

Geographers are documenting slave-built infrastructure, from railroads to ports, in use today. Such work could influence the reparations debate by showing how slavery still props up the US economy.
Efficient shipping and storage could prevent a lot of wasted vaccines. AP Photo/Morry Gash, Pool

What vaccine distribution planners can learn from Amazon and Walmart

COVID-19 vaccines have very specific storage requirements that make shipping a difficult task. Two ideas – fulfillment centers and cross-docking – could help overcome some distribution challenges.
A boat navigates at night next to large icebergs in eastern Greenland. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

Arctic Ocean: climate change is flooding the remote north with light – and new species

The Arctic has been a remote place for much of its history. But climate change is bringing global problems and opportunities to its door.
A female killer whale leaps from the water in Puget Sound near Seattle. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Pacific killer whales are dying — new research shows why

Scientists had been uncertain about why killer whales are dying in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. A new study takes an in-depth look and provides the tools to help prevent additional deaths in the future.
Oceans are teeming with life and are connected to society through history and culture, shipping and economic activity, geopolitics and recreation. (Shutterstock)

How a global ocean treaty could protect biodiversity in the high seas

International law does not meaningfully address biodiversity conservation in the high seas. We risk losing marine species before we have a chance to identify and understand them.
Suspected pirates surrender to the U.S. Coast Guard off the coast of Somalia in 2009. LCDR Tyson Weinert/U.S. Coast Guard

Global sea piracy ticks upward, and the coronavirus may make it worse

In 2019, there were fewer attacks and attempted attacks on ships than there had been in 25 years. The coronavirus may bring economic and political changes that make piracy worse in the coming years.

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