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Articles on Shipping

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Suspected pirates surrender to the U.S. Coast Guard off the coast of Somalia in 2009. LCDR Tyson Weinert/U.S. Coast Guard

Global sea piracy ticks upward, and the coronavirus may make it worse

In 2019, there were fewer attacks and attempted attacks on ships than there had been in 25 years. The coronavirus may bring economic and political changes that make piracy worse in the coming years.
Ivorian sailors participate in an anti-piracy hostage rescue scenario with the Ghanaian Navy during Exercise Obangame Express. Wikimedia Commons

Fighting piracy in the Gulf of Guinea needs a radical rethink

Feeding a simple narrative of piracy without a broader look at other maritime security challenges hinders progress in dealing with it.
A pod of narwhals (Monodon monoceros) in central Baffin Bay. Narwhals are the most vulnerable animals to increased ship traffic in the Arctic Ocean. Kristin Laidre/University of Washington

As Arctic ship traffic increases, narwhals and other unique animals are at risk

Climate change is shrinking Arctic sea ice and opening the region to ship traffic. Whales, seals and other marine mammals could be at risk unless nations adopt rules to protect them.
The Canadian Coast Guard icebreaker Louis S. St-Laurent sails past a iceberg in Lancaster Sound in 2008. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

As ice recedes, the Arctic isn’t prepared for more shipping traffic

New shipping opportunities are opening up in the Arctic as sea ice continues to recede. But travel is still dangerous and the region isn't equipped to deal with more vessel traffic.

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