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Articles on Solutions Journalism

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Volunteers are building villages of tiny houses for formerly homeless people. Bruce Kelsh/Cottage Village Coalition

3 innovations helping the homeless in Eugene, Oregon

Nonprofits and concerned residents are teaming up with the local government to solve a daunting problem in a city with the nation's highest per-capita rate of homelessnesss.
Health care workers at Lake Regional Hospital in Osage Beach, Missouri, wear face shields donated by students from Camdenton High School in Camdenton, Missouri. Provided courtesy of Camdenton High School

Students fight pandemic – and get real-world experience – by using 3D printers to make face shields

The COVID-19 outbreak presents many opportunities for students to develop needed solutions to real-life problems, says a researcher overseeing school project to produce personal protective equipment.
Natosha, a houseless resident in Los Angeles’ Skid Row points to a DIY handwashing station. Pete White/LA CAN

How can the houseless fight the coronavirus? A community organization partners with academics to create a grassroots hand-washing infrastructure

A community effort is creating do-it-yourself hand-washing stations for the homeless population in Los Angeles.
A farmer who installed solar panels to power his irrigation systems on the family farm walks by the panels near Claresholm, Alta., in June 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Drop the doom and gloom: Climate journalism is about empowerment

Climate journalism can play an important role in painting the picture of a post-carbon economy. It should start by encouraging collective action and a sense of empowerment for everyday people.
As U.S. President Donald Trump continues to cry ‘fake news’ and stir up distrust of the media, it’s time to embrace ‘solutions journalism’ that focuses on how to solve problems. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

How journalists can rebut Trump’s ‘fake news’ claims

"Solutions journalism" aims to give more prominence to solution-oriented narratives. It reports on responses to social problems by moving the solutions out of the footnotes.
The more laundry you do, the more you can save with efficient washers. Rawpixel/Shutterstock.com

Not all consumers are equal – in terms of what they save by using efficient appliances

People who use an appliance a lot save more from an energy efficient model. With the right app, they could easily get a sense of their own potential savings when they shop.
High school students at the University of Maine Farmington’s Upward Bound program playing the World Climate simulation. Mary Sinclair

How a game can move people from climate apathy to action

In the 'World Climate' simulation, people play delegates to UN climate negotiations and work to strike an agreement that meets global climate goals. Playing it has made thousands want to take action.
Protesters on the University of Cincinnati campus. AP Photo/John Minchillo

A new look at racial disparities in police use of deadly force

Does it make sense to compare the percentage of black Americans shot by police to the percentage of black Americans in the population? A new analysis suggests a different way of looking at the data.
These rats are in special cages for urine collection. Every year, millions of animals are used for testing chemicals that are used in industrial products. By unoL/shutterstock.com

AI more accurate than animal testing for spotting toxic chemicals

Testing new industrial chemicals is essential for public health and the environment. But animal testing is costly, and too many chemicals are left untested. A new AI tool may solve the problem.
Many rural farmers in India lack clear ownership of the land they work and live on. AP Photo/Anupam Nath

Blockchain-based property registries may help lift poor people out of poverty

Without secure records of property ownership, many poor people around the world have trouble improving their economic situations. Several countries are already trying blockchain-based land registries.
Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin, front, after she signed a law that allows pay-for-success funding for projects aiming to reduce female incarceration rates. AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki

Social impact bonds, explained

These partnerships between investors, governments and nonprofits are a new way to pay for programs and services that help people in need and address intractable problems like mass incarceration.

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