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Articles on Spike protein

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Mink can be readily infected with SARS-CoV-2 and then pass the virus to humans. (Shutterstock)

The mink link: How COVID-19 mutations in animals affect human health and vaccine effectiveness

In the disturbing scenario of human-to-mink-to-human COVID-19 transmission, the virus may mutate in mink prior to re-infecting people. That possibility makes vaccine design even more crucial.
A volunteer gets an injection of Moderna’s possible COVID-19 vaccine on July 27, 2020. Moderna announced Nov. 16 that its vaccine is proving highly effective in a major trial. (AP Photo/Hans Pennink)

COVID-19 vaccines: How Pfizer’s and Moderna’s 95% effective mRNA shots work

Two pharma companies have announced early COVID-19 vaccine trial results with over 90 per cent effectiveness. What does that mean for getting back to normal?
For those who have suffered from COVID-19, do their antibodies guarantee immunity from subsequent disease? Sebastian Kaulitzki/Science Photo Library via Getty Images

Am I immune to COVID-19 if I have antibodies?

If you have had COVID-19 already, are you protected from another bout of the illness? And is the presence of antibodies in your blood a guarantee of immunity?
This scanning electron microscope image shows SARS-CoV-2 (round blue objects) emerging from the surface of cells cultured in the lab. NIAID-RML

Coronavirus: A new type of vaccine using RNA could help defeat COVID-19

Traditional vaccines can take years to create. Rather than immunizing people with viral proteins, the new approach gives the molecular instructions that allows the body to make its own vaccine.
Researchers Jason McLellan (left) and Daniel Wrapp study the structure of the 2019-nCoV coronavirus. Vivian Abagiu/Univ. of Texas at Austin

Revealed: the protein ‘spike’ that lets the 2019-nCoV coronavirus pierce and invade human cells

US researchers have revealed the molecular 'key' that allows the 2019-nCoV virus to gain access to our cells. And they found it is many times more tenacious than the previous SARS virus.

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