Articles on Supreme Court

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The Supreme Court ruled that baker Jack Phillips, owner of Masterpiece Cakeshop, could refuse to make a wedding cake for a same-sex couple because of his religious beliefs. AP/David Zalubowski)

Christianity at the Supreme Court: From majority power to minority rights

There's been a reversal of power between religious and secular sides of American culture. The Supreme Court is now at the center of that shift.
A 1974 Supreme Court decision found that school segregation was allowable if it wasn’t being done on purpose. AP

The Supreme Court decision that kept suburban schools segregated

When the Supreme Court exempted suburbs in the North from the kind of desegregation orders imposed in the South, it enabled the 'de facto' segregation that continues in America's schools to this day.
U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens winds up to throw out the first pitch before the start of the Chicago Cubs game on Sept. 14, 2005. AP Photo/Jeff Roberson

Justice Stevens, Babe Ruth and the best law clerk assignment ever

Former US Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens passed away on July 16. One of his former law clerks recalls her most memorable assignment.
The Supreme Court is on summer vacation, but because of John Roberts, they may have to come back. AP/J. Scott Applewhite

Roberts rules: The 2 most important Supreme Court decisions this year were about fair elections and the chief justice

Conflict made its way to the Supreme Court this past session with two cases – one about the census, the other about gerrymandering. A court scholar says the two cases are intimately connected.
The Supreme Court is empty days before the justices vote to on the U.S. gerrymandering case. AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

After Supreme Court decision, gerrymandering fix is up to voters

The Supreme Court has issued what's likely to be its final word on partisan gerrymandering, saying it's a political issue, not a legal one. That means reform lies in the hands of voters.
Screenshot from ‘Maude’s Dilemma.’ Amazon Prime Video

A concise history of the US abortion debate

Abortion has been a huge political issue in the US for the last 50 years. But the abortion debate is not new. It began at least a century before landmark abortions rights decision Roe v. Wade.
Julian Assange goes back to court in London on May 2. Reuters/Hannah Mckay

Is the Assange indictment a threat to the First Amendment?

The US indicted WikiLeaks co-founder Julian Assange for conspiring to hack into a government computer. But the prosecution of Assange may also pose a risk to the rights of journalists in the US.

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