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Articles on Typhoons

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Residents of Cagayan de Oro survey what’s left of their homes the day after Typhoon Washi hit the Philippines in 2011.

Rebuilding from disaster: it doesn’t end when housing aid projects finish

Months after Typhoon Washi tore through the Philippines in 2011, relocated residents were moving into newly built housing. They soon began modifying and extending homes that didn't meet their needs.
In this November 2013, photo, Typhoon Haiyan survivors pass by hundreds of victims in body bags near Tacloban, Philippines. Haiyan left more than 7,300 people dead or missing. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)

Myths about disaster survivors stall the global response to climate change

The Haiyan Typhoon disaster is a cautionary case for climate adaptation and mitigation because it demonstrates the seductiveness of survival myths.
This doesn’t happen very often. But the Bureau of Meteorology is getting much better at predicting when it will. AAP Image/NEWZULU/BILL SHRAPNEL

Weather forecasting is about to get even better

Moaning about weather forecasts is almost an Australian national pastime. But weather predictions have improved a lot, and with a new satellite and supercomputer, they are about to get even more reliable.
Piton de la Fournaise or “Peak of the Furnace” on Reunion Island is one of the world’s most active volcanoes, shown erupting in August 2015. AAP/NewZulu/Vincent Dunogué

Explainer: why volcanoes erupt

What happens beneath the surface before a volcano erupts? Can we predict when one will blow? And how can typhoons and melting glaciers contribute to big eruptions?
Typhoon Haiyan as seen from space on November 9 by NASA astronaut Karen L. Nyberg. http://twitter.com/AstroKarenN

Inside Typhoon Haiyan and a year of weird weather

Even before Typhoon Haiyan struck the Philippines with such devastating force, weather watchers around the world had been tracking this year’s typhoon season with intense interest. Typhoon Haiyan has been…
Path of destruction: Haiyan makes landfall. AP Photo/Nelson Salting

Eyewitness: Typhoon Haiyan strikes the Philippines

The rain is ricocheting off the roads here in Manila. Early on Friday, our car’s tyres dragged in the deep puddles. Basketball courts - remnants of bygone American rule, and a staple of every district…
Super Typhoon Haiyan hits the islands at the mouth of the Leyte Gulf in the Philippines. NASA/NOAA

Super Typhoon Haiyan hits Philippines with devastating force

With sustained winds of more than 310 km/h, or 195 mph, as it approached the Philippines, Super Typhoon Haiyan has hit land in the past few hours with terrifying force. This makes it the strongest tropical…
Typhoon Soulik on 12th July 2013 as the storm approaches the coast of Taiwan. NASA

Avoiding annual typhoon catastrophes

Typhoon Soulik struck Taiwan at the beginning of the weekend, killing two people before moving on into Guangdong in southern China, where 300,000 people have already been evacuated. Classed as a category…

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