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Articles on Zoonotic viruses

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There is only ‘one health’ — the health of all living organisms in a global ecosystem that, when rapidly altered and imbalanced, puts us all at risk for future pandemics. (Canva)

One Health: A crucial approach to preventing and preparing for future pandemics

One Health recognizes the interrelations between the health of humans, other animals, and their shared environments. It should be integrated in the international treaty on pandemics.
Eating less animal proteins may help reduce the risk of future zoonotic viruses. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman)

How plant-based diets could help prevent the next COVID-19

Pandemic viruses arise from raising, harvesting and eating animals. Policy strategy for averting the next pandemic should include supporting those already seeking to make plant-based dietary changes.
Albanian health department workers, wearing protective suits, collect chickens, in the village of Peze Helmes some 20 km from the capital Tirana, 23 March 2006, after the second case of H5N1 bird flu was discovered in Albania. Gent Shkullaku / AFP

The keys to preventing future pandemics

Ever since the 2001 SARS outbreak and H5N1 avian flu in 2003, we’ve developed tools to monitor diseases that transmitted from animals to humans. But what does a large-scale roll-out entail?
Behind the scenes, natural history museums store biological samples from the field. Ryan Stephens

Museum specimens could help fight the next pandemic – why preserving collections is crucial to future scientific discoveries

Specimen preservation means researchers don’t need to reinvent the wheel each time they ask a new question, making it critical for the advancement of science. But many specimens are discarded or lost.
The best-known example of a zoonotic pandemic is HIV/AIDS, which originated from chimpanzees. GettyImages

What zoologists should learn from a zoonotic pandemic

Zoologists have known for decades that some of the most devastating viral infections originate from animals. Their data and research can be used in efforts to prevent pandemics.
Backyard chickens may seem free and happy, but are at increased risk of contracting diseases from wild birds. Bruce Turner/Flickr

Why it’s wrong to blame livestock farms for coronavirus

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, some critics say livestock farms promote diseases that spread from animals to humans. An animal scientist explains how well-run farms work to keep that from happening.
Wildlife markets, where live animals are sold and slaughtered, are an integral part of the global wildlife trade. GettyImages

What is the wildlife trade? And what are the answers to managing it?

Ecological systems are at breaking point and a global economic collapse is under way. It’s time to invest in risk mitigation to prevent another COVID-type disaster.
This Sunda pangolin found throughout Southeast Asia is currently considered to be critically endangered. Piekfrosch / German Wikipedia

Study shows pangolins may have passed new coronavirus from bats to humans

When a new virus emerges and triggers a pandemic, it is important to trace its origins. Knowing more about how the virus jumped species in the first place can help curb future zoonotic diseases.
Government officers seize civets in a wildlife market in Guangzhou, China to prevent the spread of SARS in 2004. Dustin Shum/South China Morning Post via Getty Images

The new coronavirus emerged from the global wildlife trade – and may be devastating enough to end it

Wild animals and animal parts are bought and sold worldwide, often illegally. This multibillion-dollar industry is pushing species to extinction, fueling crime and spreading disease.

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