Articles on sub-Saharan Africa

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Climate change and the current El Niño have left Africans more vulnerable than ever to hunger. Philimon Bulawayo/Reuters

Investing in science can help put food on Africa’s plates

Economic growth alone won't end hunger. Good policies and programmes are needed, too. Scientists and researchers have a role to play in these initiatives.
Young women who attended the International AIDS Conference in Durban, South Africa. International AIDS Society/Rogan Ward

AIDS conference 2016: the gains, the gaps, the next global steps

The focus of the 2016 International AIDS Conference has on access to necessary antiretrovirals, equity and making sure no-one is left behind. But there is a funding gap that needs to be addressed.
South African HIV rights group, the Treatment Action Campaign, marching through Durban, calling for antiretroviral access for all. International AIDS Society/Rogan Ward

It will take more than $36 billion every year to end AIDS

Current epidemiological and financial trends suggest there's a major risk of a substantial shortfall in the funds required to sustain life-saving antiretroviral programmes.
Genomic research in Africa will help explain the genetic risk factors of diseases that affect the world’s poorest people. Shutterstock

Why African genomic studies can solve the continent’s health issues

Genomic research must take place in Africa because African populations have evolved significantly and their genetic composition is more diverse than that of populations elsewhere.
Ethiopia’s Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn greets US President Barack Obama on his arrival in Ethiopia. Reuters/Tiksa Negeri

How US aid to Africa has changed in the wake of China’s growing influence

Between 1995 and 2013 the US provided about US$98 billion in aid to sub-Saharan Africa. But the country's economic and political reach is slowly declining.
A young girl from Kenya’s Pokot tribe weeps as she’s led away from her home by her future husband’s family. Reuters/Siegfried Modola

How schooling can save African girls from becoming child brides

Education can be a powerful tool to stop the practice of child marriage. It empowers girls, and their success can ultimately boost their communities.
Rwanda’s experience shows that the ‘Green Revolution’ is not as transformative as it is made out to be. Supplied

Why the ‘Green Revolution’ is making farmers poorer in Rwanda

The modernisation of agriculture has been touted by economists and the IMF as a way of reducing poverty in sub-Saharan Africa. But caution about the benefits of the Green Revolution is advisable.
Selina, right, and her friend Mwanaidi play together in a Tanzanian classroom. Children with albinism are very vulnerable to attack, mutilation and murder. EPA/Johan Baevman

Tanzania is still failing to protect its children who live with albinism

Children living with albinism are very vulnerable to attack, kidnapping, mutilation and murder. In Tanzania, fear is keeping many children away from school and costing them an education.
Rwandan President Paul Kagame at the 2016 World Economic Forum meeting in Davos. He has drawn flack for seeking a third term. Reuters/Ruben Sprich

Why Kagame’s bid to serve a third term makes sense for Rwanda

Unlike the third-term fever afflicting the Great Lakes region, Rwanda is not mired in corruption and stagnation. Rwandans were fearful and anxious about what might happen after 2017 without Kagame.
Malawian President Peter Mutharika has promised to fight the corruption that has seen donors withdraw their support for his impoverished nation. Reuters/Eldson Chagara

What drives corruption in Malawi and why it won’t disappear soon

Malawi appears to have learnt nothing from the biggest state corruption scandal that rocked the country two years ago, leading to donors withdrawing their support. The same conditions still remain.

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