Articles on sub-Saharan Africa

Displaying 21 - 40 of 114 articles

A woman casts her ballot at a polling station during a runoff presidential election in Bamako, Mali on Aug. 12, 2018. Reuters/Luc Gnago

Competitive elections are good for democracy – just not every democracy

Elections are supposed to hold politicians accountable: Officials who fear losing their seat will work harder for voters. But in some countries, political competition actually makes government worse.
Women selling farm produce in Jos, Plateau State, Nigeria. (Shutterstock)

Games boost student nutrition in Nigerian schools

Obesity and malnutrition now coexist across sub-Saharan Africa thanks to a transition to Western diets. "Gamifying" nutrition programs can help nudge youth towards healthier eating patterns.
People take shelter during the floods in Mozambique. Antonio Silva/EPA

More people in Africa need to be insured against natural disasters

While disaster insurance would go a long way in averting losses, demand for cover is still lower than expected.
Fake medicines are a lucrative global business. When it comes to malaria drugs that don’t work, they can be deadly. AP Photo/Martin Mejia

Fake drugs are one reason malaria still kills so many

Each year, 500,000 people die of malaria annually, a preventable disease. Most of them children in Africa, where many anti-malarial drugs are fake or substandard.
Children at a Koranic school in Mombasa, Kenya. Michał Huniewicz/Flickr

Arab-Islamic education in Sub-Saharan Africa: going beyond clichés to build the future

In Sub-Saharan Africa, Arab-Islamic education is neither a limited nor recent phenomena. While poorly understood, it remains a fundamental part of the educational development of the region.
Bill Gates, founder of Microsoft and co-chair of the eponymous foundation speaks at Pretoria University, Mamelodi Campus. His foundation is particularly active in the field of health care but also finances numerous institutions dedicated to research. Marco Longari/AFP

What is the influence of American foundations on universities in Africa?

American charitable foundations have gradually established themselves as key players in the African academic sector. If the benefits have been remarkable, there are risks as well.
Survivor of the mudslide are seen attending school on November 15, 2017 at the Old Skool Camp, in the mountain town of Regent on the outskirts of Sierra Leone’s capital Freetown. Saidu Bah/AFP

Can education become truly egalitarian worldwide?

About 263 million children and youth worldwide are out of school. If some progress have been made, especially on school attendance, huge gaps remain on gender parity or equity in schooling choices.

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