Articles on Vaccination

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In this April 14, 1947 file photo, a long line winds toward the entrance to Morrisania Hospital in the Bronx borough of New York, where doctors were vaccinating against smallpox. In an attempt to halt the spread of the disease, officials said city residents were being vaccinated at the rate of eight a minute. (AP Photo/File)

The elimination of smallpox showed how humans can work together to solve deadly global problems

Humans have shown that together we can overcome daunting problems, including deadly pathogens like smallpox. It is a lesson of international cooperation and respect that we should pay attention to.
Vaccinations have saved countless lives and untold suffering, even though many adults still believe vaccines are bad for their children. Africa Studios/Shutterstock.com

Why vaccine opponents think they know more than medical experts

Vaccines have long been considered safe, but many people still believe they are not. A new study shows that people who think they know more than medical experts are more likely to believe that vaccine are not safe.
To reduce the incidence of hepatitis B in Canada and to reduce mother-to-child transmission, it is vital that we vaccinate all infants at birth. (Shutterstock)

Why all Canadian infants need a hepatitis B vaccination

To meet World Health Organization targets and reduce the rates of chronic hepatitis B infection among children, Canada should implement routine vaccination of all infants at birth.
A vaccine (toxoid) against diphtheria first became available in Toronto in 1926. Thanks to the work of the Toronto Diphtheria Committee, the city was diphtheria-free by 1940. (Shutterstock)

How to increase childhood vaccination rates

Toronto's fight against diptheria teaches us the powerful impact of public health campaigns -- in persuading parents to vaccinate their children.
Complementary medicine practitioners could prove to be a valuable source of information about vaccinations. Stutterstock

How complementary medicine practitioners can help get kids vaccinated

Australian parents who visit complementary health practitioners are less likely to vaccinate their kids. But could these practitioners be best placed to educate sceptical parents about vaccination?
What will it take to finish polio off in the last three countries where it persists? AP Photo/B.K. Bangash

Inching closer to a world without polio

Pakistan had only eight new diagnoses of polio in 2017. The virus' days look numbered – but health workers have their work cut out for them to eradicate the devastating disease once and for all.
Could the yearly flu shot become a thing of the past? AP Photo/Darron Cummings, File

Influenza: The search for a universal vaccine

Flu virus mutates so quickly that one year's vaccine won't work on the next year's common strains. But rational design – a new way to create vaccines – might pave the way for more lasting solutions.
A baby cries during diphtheria immunisation at a clinic in Cibinong, Bogor, West Java, south of Jakarta, Indonesia, December 5, 2017. Antara Foto/Yulius Satria Wijaya/via REUTERS

Indonesia’s diphtheria outbreak: problems in vaccination and antibiotics efficacy

An outbreak of diphtheria in Indonesia is not caused by a singular factor. The country needs better vaccination coverage and distribution as well as better antibiotics.
Beds with patients in an emergency hospital in Camp Funston, Kansas, during the influenza epidemic around 1918. National Museum of Health and Medicine.

The mystery of a 1918 veteran and the flu pandemic

Many healthy young men and women, including military personnel, died in the 1918 flu pandemic. It's a reminder of how dangerous influenza can be.

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