Articles on Brazil

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The Iguazu Falls in Brazil are part of the Guarani Aquifer, one of the world’s major underground reserves of fresh water. The 8th World Water Forum, part of 2018 World Water Day, is being held in Brazil, home to the most fresh water on Earth. (Shutterstock)

Why every day should be World Water Day

Water is one of our most precious resources, yet it's in danger. World Water Day reminds us of the need to develop policies and governance to avoid squandering water.
The Amazon rainforest is fed by a rich network of creeks, streams and rivers. Informal road construction is now endangering this critical ecosystem. Rickey Rogers/Reuters

Amazonian dirt roads are choking Brazil’s tropical streams

Thousands of dirt roads crisscross the Brazilian Amazon, serving ranchers, loggers and miners. The area's fragile waterways — and the spectacular fish that live in them — pay a high price.
Survivor of the mudslide are seen attending school on November 15, 2017 at the Old Skool Camp, in the mountain town of Regent on the outskirts of Sierra Leone’s capital Freetown. Saidu Bah/AFP

Can education become truly egalitarian worldwide?

About 263 million children and youth worldwide are out of school. If some progress have been made, especially on school attendance, huge gaps remain on gender parity or equity in schooling choices.
The Venezuelans now rushing across the border to seek refuge in Brazil join millions of Brazilian migrants who’ve been displaced within their own country. Nacho Doce/Reuters

Venezuelan refugees inflame Brazil’s already simmering migrant crisis

Since 2000, 8.8 million Brazilians have been displaced by disaster, development and crime, new data shows. Now Venezuelan migrants are pouring into the country. Still, Brazil has no real refugee plan.
An appeals court ruling against Lula may disqualify this popular former Brazilian president from running again in October 2018. Supporters vehemently maintain his innocence. Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters

Presidential corruption verdict shows just how flawed Brazil’s justice system is

An appeals court ruling against popular Brazilian ex-president Lula has hotly divided Brazil. A legal scholar argues that this is a case of activist judges taking their anti-graft crusade too far.
The cancer Kaposi sarcoma. South Africa has large productivity losses because of deaths caused by it. Shutterstock

Cancer is costing BRICS economies billions each year

Policies encouraging lifestyle changes that reduce the risk of cancer could have positive effects on the economies of BRICS countries.
Intersectionality in action: Brazilian women are organizing across class and race lines to decry inequality in a country that remains deeply ‘machista.’ Naco Doce/Reuters

Beyond #MeToo, Brazilian women rise up against racism and sexism

Before #MeToo, Brazilian women launched #MyFirstHarrassment and marched for racial equality. Today, this feminist resurgence is tackling health care, plastic surgery, violence and more.
Introducing rural and indigenous communities to science, through experiments and communication, is vital. Felipe Figueira

Indigenous languages must feature more in science communication

The combination of knowledge and communication, along with a few other fundamental conditions such as liberty and respect , leads to social, cultural and technological development.
A medium-size passenger jet burns roughly 750 gallons of fuel per hour.

Jet fuel from sugarcane? It’s not a flight of fancy

Scientists have engineered sugarcane to increase its oil content and are developing renewable jet aircraft fuel from the oil. The engineered sugarcane could become a valuable energy crop.

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