Articles on Justin Trudeau

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Supporters wave signs during an anti-carbon tax rally in Calgary in October 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Why Alberta would be foolish to abandon carbon policy

Given Alberta's innovative spirit and its emissions-reducing results, is this a time for the province to turn its back on carbon policy and tarnish its reputation in a world transitioning to lower carbon?
In this August 2017 photo, an RCMP officer informs a migrant couple of the location of a legal border station, shortly before they illegally crossed from Champlain, N.Y., to Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle, Québec. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP/Charles Krupa

Closing the Canada-U.S. asylum border agreement loophole? Not so fast

Canada wants to expand a Canada-U.S. pact to make it tougher for asylum-seekers from the U.S. to come to Canada. The question is: What will Canada have to give the United States to get them to agree?
Former SNC-Lavalin CEO Pierre Duhaime leaves a courtroom in Montreal in February 2019. Duhaime pleaded guilty in a bribe scandal around the construction of a $1.3-billion Montreal hospital. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

SNC-Lavalin: Deferred prosecution deals aren’t get-out-of-jail free cards

The SNC-Lavalin controversy has resulted in some misunderstandings and misinterpretations of the legal mechanism at its heart: Deferred prosecution agreements.
Jane Philpott and Jody Wilson-Raybould are seen during a news conference in Ottawa in June 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Justin Trudeau cabinet resignations a rarity in Canadian history

While the Wilson-Raybould/Philpott resignations are historic by the numbers, they may also prove historic in creating a new faith in federal cabinet, a previously elite and closed decision-making body.
The Padma Bridge Project in Bangladesh is seen in this February 2018 photograph. SNC-Lavalin was accused of bribing officials in the construction of the bridge, though charges were later dropped. Md Shaifuzzaman Ayon

Canada’s SNC-Lavalin decisions affect people in the world’s poorest countries

Promoting Canadian jobs is part of any government’s political mandate, but so too is the responsibility of ensuring that Canadian businesses are not supporting or condoning corruption abroad.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau holds a news conference in Ottawa to respond to allegations his office pressured former attorney general Jody Wilson-Raybould in the SNC-Lavalin affair. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Fred Chartrand

SNC-Lavalin & the need for fresh thinking around independence and interference

The prospect of political interference is at the heart of the SNC-Lavalin controversy. But it raises more issues related to identifying and preventing inappropriate interference.
It could be easy to scoff at Canadian laws that might have allowed SNC-Lavalin to avoid prosecution for bribery and fraud. But they’re working exactly as they should. (Shutterstock)

SNC-Lavalin: Canada’s anti-foreign bribery laws did their job

While the SNC-Lavalin scandal rages on, we should not lose sight of the importance of combating bribery crimes and enforcing the laws to prevent it.
Sir John A. Macdonald was not only Canada’s first prime minister, he was the first justice minister and attorney general. Jody Wilson-Raybould has suggested the two roles should be split. National Archives of Canada/THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Is Sir John A. Macdonald to blame for the Wilson-Raybould affair?

Sir John A. Macdonald fused the jobs of justice minister and attorney general as Canada's first prime minister. So is he partly to blame for the SNC-Lavalin controversy?
NDP leader Jagmeet Singh celebrates his Burnaby South byelection win on Feb. 25, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Byelection win offers Singh an opportunity to reset his leadership

Jagmeet Singh needed to win the byelection in Burnaby South. Now that the NDP leader will have a seat in Parliament, can he still turn around the party's fortunes before this year's federal election?
Is the SNC-Lavalin controversy truly a political scandal? If so, it’s unlike any we’ve seen before in Canada. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is seen here in January 2019 with Jody Wilson-Raybould after she was shuffled out of her job as attorney general. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Is the SNC-Lavalin controversy truly a scandal?

A standard political scandal involves a person who did something wrong out of negligence or motivations of money, personal ambition, sex, etc. But the SNC-Lavalin affair so far lacks those elements.
Gerald Butts, principal secretary to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, is seen on April 20, 2018. Butts resigned amid allegations that the Prime Minister’s Office interfered to prevent a criminal prosecution of SNC-Lavalin. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darren Calabrese

The SNC-Lavalin affair and the politics of prosecution

The SNC-Lavalin affair raises fundamental questions about how decisions to prosecute are made, and what role elected politicians should have in that process -- if any at all.
An anti-government protester covers her face with a Venezuelan flag, and uses toothpaste around her eyes to help lessen the effect of tear gas, during clashes with security forces after a rally demanding the resignation of President Nicolas Maduro in Caracas, Venezuela. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano)

Canada’s disturbing indifference to the plight of Venezuelans

Canada has been considered a human rights champion when it comes to accepting Syrian refugees. So why is it doing next to nothing for those fleeing Venezuela?
In this image taken from video footage run by China’s CCTV, Canadian Robert Lloyd Schellenberg attends his retrial in northeastern China. A Chinese court has sentenced him to death in a sudden retrial in a drug smuggling case that is escalating tensions between the countries over the Canadian arrest of a top Chinese technology executive. (CCTV via AP)

It’s time for Canada and China to tone down the rhetoric

Now is the time to give China the chance to show that while the Chinese justice system can mete out punishment, it can also exercise compassion and could spare the life of a Canadian drug smuggler.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks about the federal government’s newly imposed carbon tax at an event in Toronto in October 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Rethinking Canada’s climate policy from the ground up

Canada's top-down approach to designing its climate policy has failed. It needs to find ways to engage with individuals.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau meets British Prime Minister Theresa May at the G20 Summit in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on Dec. 1, 2018. Post-Brexit, Canada and the U.K. have a chance to transform their economies by working together. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Post-Brexit, the U.K. and Canada can fuel global sustainability

As 2019 dawns, a worldwide circular economy could be created through international trade and trade agreements like the one that could be forged between Canada and the U.K., post-Brexit.
Canadian Union of Postal Workers (CUPW) members stand on picket line in Halifax in October 2018 after a call for a series of rotating 24-hour strikes. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ted Pritchard

Back-to-work legislation may come back to haunt Justin Trudeau

Ordering Canada's postal workers back on the job may hurt Justin Trudeau. CUPW could direct its anger directly at the Trudeau Liberals ahead of the 2019 federal election.

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