Articles on Research ethics

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It’s not always clear where human organs come from in research papers. Piron Guillaume/unsplash

Whose hearts, livers and lungs are transplanted in China? Origins must be clear in human organ research

International standards ban publication of research that involves any biological material from executed prisoners, that lacks human research ethics committee approval and that lacks consent of donors.
Park guards view maps and photos of high-altitude glaciers – information that can be shared with local communities dealing with changing water levels. Anne Toomey

Redefining ‘impact’ so research can help real people right away, even before becoming a journal article

Science can't just stay in the ivory tower. But what does impact really mean and how does it happen? A study of more than a decade of ecological fieldwork projects in Bolivia suggests a better way.
Working out ethical implications forces students to explain what may be vaguely defined plans in a concrete form. Shutterstock

Facebook data: why ethical reviews matter in academic research

Ethical review is often seen as a barrier to research and innovation within universities, but it can be constructive. More attention should be paid to the potential benefits of the process.
What’s your ‘street race’? blvdone/shutterstock.com

The US Census Bureau keeps confusing race and ethnicity

The upcoming census, like many before it, will boil complex information on race, ethnicity and ancestry into just two questions. That leaves a lot of important information out of the data.
Ethics procedures aim to protect research participants from harm. from www.shutterstock.com

How ethical is sexual assault research?

A recent survey about sexual assault on university campuses was criticised as being unethical. So what is the right way to go about conducting such research?
Experiment design affects the quality of the results. IAEA Seibersdorf Historical Images

Why isn’t science better? Look at career incentives

Embracing more rigorous scientific methods would mean getting science right more often than we currently do. But the way we value and reward scientists makes this a challenge.

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