Articles sur Academic publishing

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Predatory publishers are vultures feeding on academics’ worries about output and incentives. Ondacaracola/Shutterstock

Why developing countries are particularly vulnerable to predatory journals

If there's a general sense that academic publication is about knowledge dissemination rather than meeting performance targets, academics and universities become less vulnerable to predatory journals.
Locking articles away behind a paywall stifles access. Elizabeth

Academic journal publishing is headed for a day of reckoning

In our institutions of higher education and our research labs, scholars first produce, then buy back, their own content. With the costs rising and access restricted, something's got to give.
Women are less likely to be published in scientific journals. Shutterstock

Women scientists lag in academic publishing, and it matters

Women can often draw attention to dimensions of thinking that their male perspective may miss. But this will only work if they are in positions that allow them to lead and drive the research agenda.
More is less in the world of research publications. Desktop image via www.shutterstock.com.

Peer review is in crisis, but should be fixed, not abolished

The traditional mode of publishing scientific research faces much criticism – primarily for being too slow and sometimes shoddily done. Maybe fewer publications of higher quality is the way forward.
There are sharks in the research water – predatory journals are becoming more common in Africa. Shutterstock

African academics are being caught in the predatory journal trap

African academics and universities have been caught in the predatory journal web. It's time for the continent's universities to start taking this threat to their integrity seriously.
It’s one thing for a country’s academics to produce great research – but what’s the point if ordinary citizens can’t access it? Shutterstock

Why it’s getting harder to access free, quality academic research

South Africans' access to important knowledge and research is incredibly limited. In this time of Open Access, why is this the case – and will it ever change?
Open access allows users to download, copy, print and distribute works, without the need to ask for permission or to pay. Meredith Kahn/Flickr

Your Questions Answered on open access

To the mark the eighth annual Open Access Week, we asked our readers what they wanted to know about the initiative. Here are their questions with answers from our experts.
A majority of academic research is still locked away from public eyes. Shutterstock

The battle for open access is far from over

We have the technology and the will to expand open access to publicly funded research, but large vested interests are still putting up stiff resistance.
Academic publishers are attempting to build a walled garden around their content, blocking it off from public eyes. the.Firebottle/Flickr

Publisher pushback puts open access in peril

A new policy by publisher Elsevier is threatening to wind back the gains made by the open access movement.

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