Articles sur Democracy Futures

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Does Japan’s moral education system leave any room for students to appreciate diversity and think critically? Ajari/flickr

From bakery to wagashiya: a textbook case of ‘moral education’ in Japan

The changes required of a textbook that referred to a bakery – an “inappropriate” form of Japanese culture – illustrate how the system falls short of its goals of deliberative and critical education.
Turkey may soon become one of the few countries in the history of democracy to vote for the death of democracy. Steve Evans/flickr

Turkey on the verge of democide as referendum looms

If the 'yes' vote prevails in this month's constitutional referendum, the Turkish people may be in the rare position of democratically approving the death of their own democracy.
Businesses lower down in the supply chain are waiting months for payment, but Coles has moved to pay 1,000 suppliers within 14 days. Julian Smith/AAP

Late payments: the policy no-brainer for business

Putting a stop to powerful corporations exploiting their powerless suppliers would not only deliver small-business votes but would speed up the entire economy.
Could a randomly selected tree make a better president than Donald Trump? Bruce Irschick/flickr

Democracy needs more trees and less Trump

If people are starting to look much worse in democratic terms, trees are starting to look much better. We are learning that plants engage in meaningful and, more to the point, truthful communication.
It seems even Macquarie’s own ex-bankers feel the sting of an ‘investment advice’ fees trail. Joel Carrett/AAP

Hidden fees and the lowdown on Macquarie’s latest way to make money

For those who might wish to check if they are being swatted unwittingly with undisclosed or barely disclosed fees on their investments, there appears to be one solid approach to take: ring up and ask.
It’s quite a feat to sell beer to a nation of drinkers like Australia and not record a taxable income. Bala Sivakumar/flickr

Multinational tax dodgers are the real leaners

Nowhere is the impotence of politicians and regulators more costly than in their failure to stand up to multinational corporations dodging tax.
Are the foxes in charge of the henhouse? MomentsForZen/flickr

Australia’s march towards corporatocracy

Confounding the familiar government narrative of reckless spending binges by Labor, the Coalition actually has the record of greater profligacy when it comes to showering billions of dollars of taxpayers…
Julian Leek/AAP

The Death of President Trump

We live in darkening times, so it’s time for some dark humour. Inspired by the antics of a Big Man with a Big Mouth, think just for a moment about the important subject of how democracies treat their elected…
Donald Trump’s reinvention of the royal fiat as rule-by-tweet, or ‘twiat’, is anti-democratic and needs to be resisted. Twitter

Trump, the wannabe king ruling by ‘twiat’

Donald Trump is reinventing the royal fiat by novel means: the rule-by-tweet, or 'twiat'. This move is not an extension of popular democracy, but its enemy, and it needs to be resisted.
Just say no! Tyranny depends on mass subservience. Alek S./flickr

To resist Trump’s tyranny, just don’t comply

The origin of tyrannical power is irrelevant: whether by election, inheritance or force, if rulership is oppressive, it is tyrannical. And the way to beat it is deceptively simple: refuse to comply.
By engaging a broad base of people on a popular level, film has a much more immediate and visceral impact than formal lustration proceedings. Before the Rain (1994)

Cinema opens a dialogue about coming to terms with Balkans’ past

Cinema can be instrumental in opening up dialogue on collective culpability for the past. Manchevski’s Before the Rain and Angelopoulos’ Ulysses’ Gaze are perfect examples of this.
Graffiti on a wall in Sana'a, Yemen, denounces US drone strikes that have killed scores of civilians. Khaled Abdullah/Reuters

War and democracy in the age of Trump

The ancient Greek historian Herodotus once observed that Persian rulers indulged the habit of getting drunk when making important decisions. When sober and sensible next morning, their custom was to reconsider…
Podemos must reconsider who is above and who is below – who are the people and who are the people’s enemy. Podemos Uviéu/flickr

Podemos find itself caught between the battle lines of Spanish politics

Podemos positioned itself as leading a revolt by the people against the political system. Now, as Spain's third-largest party, it is part of that system and has some difficult decisions to make.
On September 15, 2012, a protest in Sydney by Salafi Muslims against an ‘anti-Islam’ film ended in violent confrontations with police. Jamie Kennedy/flickr

By framing secular society as a Christian creation, Hanson’s revival goes beyond simple racism

One Nation has built on the racism of its original anti-Asian platform by linking Australia's secular society to its Christian origins and presenting Islam as incompatible with this way of life.
Italians voted “No” by a convincing margin in the referendum on constitutional change.

What’s next for Italy?

In a climate of widespread discontent with Italy's political establishment, a new election might wipe out most of the parties in the current government coalition.

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