Articles sur Photography

Affichage de 1 à 20 de 77 articles

A light graffiti image of Ms Dhu is projected on a building in Perth. Ethan Blue

Seeing Ms Dhu: how photographs argue for human rights

Noel Pearson has accused the ABC of racism in dwelling on indigenous alienation. But many advances in the status of Aboriginal Australians have been prompted by revealing ill-treatment, which is why Ms Dhu's family want footage of her last hours made public.
Shutterstock

Selfie is not a dirty word

Selfies are blamed for encouraging everything from risky behaviour to rampant narcissism. But selfies can be potent acts of self-communication – and anyway, is self-regard a bad thing?
‘Everything is sharply defined; we can even count his freckles.’ Detail of Diane Arbus, Boy with a straw hat waiting to march in a pro-war parade, N.Y.C., 1967. Courtesy of the National Gallery of Australia

Here’s looking at: ‘Boy with a straw hat …’ by Diane Arbus

In 1967, as flower children across America marched against the Vietnam war, Diane Arbus chose to photograph a young man wearing a 'Bomb Hanoi' badge. What did she capture, about the boy and the time?
Photos of beaming young asylum-seekers with their families aboard HMAS Adelaide in October 2001 told a completely different story to the government’s spurious ‘children overboard’ claims. Courtesy Project SafeCom, Jack H Smit.

Friday essay: worth a thousand words – how photos shape attitudes to refugees

Images move us to act – as last week's episode of Four Corners has shown. Our government has gone to great lengths to suppress photos that humanise asylum seekers – but when they seep out, empathy is aroused.
With our attention diverted, we’re no longer in the moment. 'Concert' via www.shutterstock.com

What’s lost when we photograph life instead of experiencing it?

Whether it’s through Facebook or Snapchat, images and videos are changing how we communicate. But as words become more trivial, our attention, our creativity, and even our empathy may be at stake.
Researchers in Maine pose with terns after measuring, weighing and banding the birds. But what if they weren’t scientists? Amanda Boyd, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service/Flickr

Even scientists take selfies with wild animals. Here’s why they shouldn’t.

Why do so many people take safety risks or abuse wild animals for the sake of a photo with them? In one researcher's view, scientists may encourage this trend by sharing their own wildlife selfies.
Cindy Sherman was the subject, costume designer, make-up artist and photographer for the large-scale images showcased in a new retrospective. Detail: Untitled #466. Image courtesy of Cindy Sherman and Metro Pictures, New York

Here’s looking at: Cindy Sherman ‘Head Shots’

Cindy Sherman understands how people perform for the camera. Her art is a portrait of human vulnerability.
Migrant children can feel left out and excluded in schools far from home. Kim Ludbrook/EPA

How teachers can help migrant learners feel more included

Migrant children may feel uncomfortable or shy trying to verbally explain their experiences. Photography is a powerful medium through which to make their voices heard.
A nurse treats Johnny at Vancouver’s Crosstown Clinic before he self-injects his medication. © Aaron Goodman

Humanizing the heroin epidemic: a photo essay

Hoping to avoid the pitfalls and tropes of drug genre photography, documentary photographer Aaron Goodman spent a year following three addicts enrolled in a heroin-assisted treatment program.

Les contributeurs les plus fréquents

Plus