Articles sur Tectonic plates

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The Tianshan mountains frame Sayram Lake in the Bortala Prefecture in Xinjiang, China. Gilby Jepson

How Eurasia’s Tianshan mountains set a stage that changed the world

Setting the scene for ancient Silk Road trading and now China's Belt and Road initiative, the Tianshan has changed humanity. Geological evidence shows us how this incredible mountain range formed.
Luckily, monitoring systems at Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano allowed some warning before fissures opened up in 2018. United States Geological Survey/AAP

Would an eruption in Melbourne really match Hawaii’s volcanoes? Here’s the evidence

Melbourne lies at the eastern end of a volcanic province, but when's it going to blow? Understanding the geology of Melbourne and comparing it to Hawaii is really helpful in calculating risk.
Lifeguards and volunteers run across an ash covered slope after the June 3 eruption of the Fuego volcano in Guatemala. Esteban Biba/AAP

From Kilauea to Fuego: three things you should know about volcano risk

Important points about volcanoes: location matters, explosiveness can be predicted to an extent, and fast-moving flows of volcanic materials (known as pyroclastic flows) are deadly.
Seismic shockwaves after a meteorite’s collision could affect systems all over the planet. solarseven/Shutterstock.com

More bad news for dinosaurs: Chicxulub meteorite impact triggered global volcanic eruptions on the ocean floor

Research suggests a new threat to life on Earth from the meteorite's crash: Via seismic waves, the impact triggered massive undersea eruptions, as big as any ever seen in our planet's history.
A detection station for seismic activity at Bilibion, a remote corner of Russia. The Official CTBTO Photostream (Copyright CTBTO Preparatory Commission)

I’ve always wondered: do nuclear tests affect tectonic plates and cause earthquakes or volcanic eruptions?

Human-induced earthquakes have been reported from every continent except Antarctica. We asked a geologist to investigate whether North Korea's nuclear tests could trigger geological changes.
The new map was created using data from rocks found in locations including Madagascar. Alan Collins

A map that fills a 500-million year gap in Earth’s history

You would not recognise Earth if you saw it 500 million years ago - the lands, oceans, climate and life were all very different. Scientists now have a new map of the deep history of Earth.

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