Artikel-artikel mengenai Indigenous Peoples

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In this April 14, 1947 file photo, a long line winds toward the entrance to Morrisania Hospital in the Bronx borough of New York, where doctors were vaccinating against smallpox. In an attempt to halt the spread of the disease, officials said city residents were being vaccinated at the rate of eight a minute. (AP Photo/File)

The elimination of smallpox showed how humans can work together to solve deadly global problems

Humans have shown that together we can overcome daunting problems, including deadly pathogens like smallpox. It is a lesson of international cooperation and respect that we should pay attention to.
Maasai women on a conservation project in Kenya. Joan de la Malla

Indigenous peoples are crucial for conservation – a quarter of all land is in their hands

A new map shows that more than 25% of all land outside Antarctica is held and managed by Indigenous peoples. This makes these communities vital allies in the global conservation effort.
Tiana Schocko, from Peshawbestown, Mich., and of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa tribe, competes in the youth division of the 22nd Annual World Championship Hoop Dance Contest Sunday, Feb. 12, 2012, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

Federal budget undermines Indigenous self-determination in sport programs

The federal government's 2018 budget allocates almost $50 million over five years to support sports programs for Indigenous peoples. The problem? The money is going to a non-Indigenous organization.
Indigenous, LGBT, Black and refugee youth are among the groups that are at a greater risk of cyberbullying than others. But youth can also be powerful agents of change. Clarke Sanders/Unsplash

Don’t be a bystander: Five steps to fight cyberbullying

Cyberbullying has become destructive and feels unstoppable. Here is a five-step technique for dealing with it.
Gates of the Arctic National Park, Alaska. Plants on the Arctic tundra absorb mercury from the air, then transfer it to soil when they die. Paxson Woelber

Mercury from industrialized nations is polluting the Arctic – here’s how it gets there

How do mercury emissions from industrialized countries reach the remote Arctic? Recent research shows that plants on the tundra absorb mercury vapor through their leaves, then pass it into soil.
African Americans are being misdiagnosed with the heart condition (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy) that caused the sudden death of basketball player Hank Gathers (pictured left with teammate Bo Kimble) in 1990. Lack of ethnic diversity in genomic databases is a big part of the reason for these misdiagnoses. (AP Photo/Douglas C. Pizac, File)

How the genomics health revolution is failing ethnic minorities

Genome sequencing is transforming the way we diagnose disease. But lack of diversity in genomic data means only some Canadians will benefit from this revolutionary technology.
Maggie Cywink, of Whitefish River First Nation, holds up a sign behind Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau during a summit in Ottawa in support of missing and murdered Indigenous women. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Why the Indigenous in New Zealand have fared better than those in Canada

The Indigenous in New Zealand have fared better than First Nations in Canada in terms of self-determination. Why? It's about a lot more than geography, land mass and language.
The Scream, by Kent Monkman (2016), is part of a traveling exhibition this year on colonized Canada: Shame And Prejudice: A Story Of Resilience. Kent Monkman

All mouth and no ears: Settlers with Opinions

A leading Indigenous academic says too many Canadians take ugly pleasure in being ignorant about Indigenous issues. It's time for some straight talk about Settlers with Opinions.
Canada’s former prime minister, Stephen Harper, is greeted by a Maori warrior in New Zealand in November 2014. New Zealand’s electoral system allows for far greater Indigenous involvement than Canada’s. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Lessons for Canada in New Zealand’s Indigenous-friendly electoral system

As New Zealanders head to the polls this week, there are lessons for Canada in the country's electoral system — in particular how it gives Indigenous people a greater role in governing.
Cover art from “Annie Muktuk and Other Stories,” Norma Dunning’s first book filled with sixteen Inuit stories which portray the unvarnished realities of northern life via strong and gritty characters. (University of Alberta Press)

Writing is the air I breathe: Publishing as an Inuit writer

Inuit poet, scholar and writer Norma Dunning shares her experiences of trying to get published in Canada.
Success will come from changing the way Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s issues are talked about and addressed – from one of deficit in which people are described as problematic to one of empowerment and strength. Global Panorama/Flickr

Indigenous reconciliation in Australia: still a bridge too far?

In many ways, the "great Australian silence" about Indigenous history, pointed out by eminent anthropologist W.E.H. Stanner back in 1968, still endures in this country some 50 years later.
Native Americans have struggled for recognition of the violence done to them through colonisation and the persistent harms of settler colonialism. EPA/Mike Nelson

Indigenous reconciliation in the US shows how sovereignty and constitutional recognition work together

Despite significant shortcomings in the negotiation, content and honouring of treaties, they continue to define the nature of the relationship between most Native Americans and the United States.
Despite the Treaty of Waitangi, acts by both the British Crown and successive New Zealand governments have had detrimental effects on the Māori population. AAP Image/SNPA Pool, David Rowland

New Zealand’s indigenous reconciliation efforts show having a treaty isn’t enough

Reconciliation efforts were established in New Zealand 30 years ago to tackle grievances stemming from government initiatives that have seen Māori lose both resources and power.
Apologies for past injustices issued to indigenous people in Canada, Australia, the United States and New Zealand in the last few decades are signs of progress. butupa/Flickr

Indigenous reconciliation is hard, it re-opens wounds to heal them

Australia's national legitimacy is compromised by the failure to repair its relationship with its Indigenous population. Our series explores different ways of resolving this unfinished business.
On the hunt for other cultures. Shutterstock/Gorosi

What does an anthropologist actually do?

Ask any anthropologist what they do and they will find it hard to give you a direct answer. But it ultimately comes down to studying people and their culture.

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