Swinburne University of Technology

Swinburne is an innovative education institution that provides quality career-oriented education. Our strong technological base and links with industry are complemented by innovative research centres and strong international partnerships. Swinburne has programs for learners at every level, from vocational training through to PhDs, with pathway opportunities that allow students to achieve their personal best education outcome.


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Trichotillomania is a psychological disorder that leads people to compulsively and uncontrollably pull out their own hair. Cavale Doom/Flickr

Pulling out your hair in frustration? What you need to know about trichotillomania

People with trichotillomania often pull to the point of causing complete hair loss even though that's never intended or desired. And this eventually leaves them feeling depressed and isolated.
Nantong China indigo-dyed cloth shoes and calico cloth. Elizabeth Tunstall

Undying: the life and death of an indigo cloth

The Nantongese Granny was angry. She believed her grandson was bringing a potential bride, not a group of researchers, to see her collection of indigo-dyed fabrics. Her sons and daughters laid out her…
Dramatic, but not apocalyptic. Stanimir G Stoev

Fact over fiction on the ‘apocalyptic’ super blood moon

A rare super blood moon visible from parts of the Earth this month will delight those people lucky enough to see it. But why has this marvel of the solar system got some people so worried?
Coding: it’s just another language to learn at school. Flickrabg_colegio

Want your kids to learn another language? Teach them code

Computer coding should be thought of as teaching children another language. If they get the basics right at an early age, who knows where their new-found language skills can take them.
Labor’s Terri Butler is co-sponsoring a bill to make acts of ‘revenge porn’ a federal crime. AAP/Mick Tsikas

How making ‘revenge porn’ a federal crime would combat its rise

The internet, smartphones and social media mean that extensive sharing of private images without consent is far easier than in the past. And the severity of the harm victims suffer is far greater.
Dark matter is notoriously hard to detect, but a new experiment might finally shed light on this mysterious substance. Dirk Dallas/Flickr

How we plan to bring dark matter to light

A new detector built deep underground in a gold mine will hopefully unravel the mystery of dark matter.
Many features of Australians’ and their government’s current response to the Syrian refugee crisis are familiar. Reuters/Alkis Konstantinidis

Australia’s resettlement of Syrian refugees is tinged with déjà vu

We need to see Australia's response to the Syrian refugee crisis in perspective – in relation to what's been done elsewhere and to what Australia has done on similar occasions in the past.
People queue outside the first KFC restaurant in Yangon, Myanmar, which opened last month. Nyein Chan Naing/EPA/AAP

How marketers condition us to buy more junk food

By bidding the price of unhealthy food down, fast food marketers are normalising everyday consumption.
The activities we do during the day – from having a fight with a partner to using our iPhones at night – also affect our hormone levels and, in turn, our quality of sleep. Jan Faukner/Shutterstock

Chemical messengers: how hormones help us sleep

Sleep allows many of our hormones to replenish so we have the optimal energy, immunity, appetite and coping ability to face the day’s highs and lows.
In a world that is already filled with clutter, simplicity is a strong message. Google

Yes, Google has a new logo – but why?

Google has unveiled its new logo, adopting a sans-serif typeface and retaining the same colours as before. But is it better or more practical than the logo it replaces?

Re-Designing the Conference

I recently concluded the Americas Cultures-Based Innovation (CBI) Symposium, co-hosted by the Banff Centre in Calgary, Canada. Being the third time that I have co-organised a CBI Symposium, I now know…
Science in the Cinema this year sorted fact from fiction in the 1982 cult classic Bladerunner. ElectricDynamite/flickr

The science and fiction behind Blade Runner

Medical research can be complex and difficult to understand, but cinematic representations of mad scientists who speak gobbledygook add to the confusion. An annual event separates fact from fiction.
Scaling back our collective overuse of electricity would create a huge resource that can be tapped for future power needs. Weerayut Ranmal/Shutterstock.com

Cutting back on wasted electricity is the cleanest power source of all – as our household shows

A few years ago, I couldn’t read an energy bill beyond the charge levied. I couldn’t tell you how energy was measured, or ultimately how its use related to making my life better or worse, let alone how…

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