Articles on Diabetes

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Younger Canadians are going meatless, but Canada still has a love affair with meat, according to a Dalhousie University study. This 2015 photo shows rib eye steak with gochujang butter and nori. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

Young Canadians lead the charge to a meatless Canada

Canadians still love their meat, but consumers under 35 are three times more likely to consider themselves vegetarians or vegans than consumers who are 49 or older.
An exaggerated immune response during pregnancy, known as ‘maternal immune activation’, could be detrimental to the fetus. from

Bugs and allergies in pregnancy linked to child developmental disorders, like autism and ADHD

Certain mechanisms that occur as a result of an immune response during an illness in pregnancy could impact a child's brain development. And more studies are showing a relationship between the two.
Governments in countries such as Mexico and the United Kingdom have responded to the over-consumption of refined sugar with a “sugar tax;” Canada lags behind. (Unsplash/Neven Krcmarek)

Just how bad is all that sugar for your heart?

Too much refined sugar in your diet is not just a risk factor for obesity and diabetes, it also increases your chances of heart disease.
While death rates from heart and kidney disease have dropped among Indigenous people, death rates from cancer are on the rise. from

To close the health gap, we need programs that work. Here are three of them

Politicians make sweeping statements on how to close the gap. But here's advice from people working directly with Indigenous communities who have evidence for what actually works.
The presence of sidewalks, green space, healthy food outlets, and trustworthy neighbours can all play a part in minimizing your risks of heart disease. (Shutterstock)

How your community impacts the health of your heart

As 'Heart Month' kicks off across North America, a cardiovascular researcher explains how the neighbourhood you live in can affect your risks of heart disease.
Members of the James Bay Cree gather around the fire as part of a week-long celebration called ‘wellness week,’ aimed at improving personal health and wellness in their community in northern Québec. (David DyckFehderau)

Indigenous group tackles diabetes with storytelling

Like many Indigenous groups around the world, the James Bay Cree of northern Québec have a disproportionately high rate of diabetes. They’re facing it down with a decidedly Indigenous solution.
For many parents, it’s the haul of gummy worms, licorice, chocolate bars and other high-sugar candies that their kids bring home - not the ghouls and zombies - that is terrifying about Halloween. (Shutterstock)

How to avoid a Halloween sugar disaster

Halloween is upon us, and the sugar is horrible for your kids' teeth and health. But fear not -- there are things parents can do to lessen the impact of the candy binge.
Trade and investment agreements can increase consumption of unhealthy foods, sugary drinks and tobacco – leading to soaring rates of obesity and chronic diseases globally. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

The hidden connection between obesity, heart disease and trade

As government representatives meet at the WHO global conference on noncommunicable diseases in Uruguay this week, their focus should be on reducing the health impacts of trade deals.
When we sit, we accumulate calories and excess fat which can cause obesity, diabetes, cancer, heart disease and death. The solution may be as simple as counting. (Shutterstock)

How to stop sitting yourself to death

If you sit all day at work, then cancer, diabetes, heart disease and death are the likely outcomes. A cardiologist explains how the simple act of counting can reverse this evolutionary trend.
This study didn’t actually measure sitting and its relationship to inflammation - which causes disease. D.Reichardt/Flickr

Research Check: will binge-watching TV increase your risk for Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes?

A new study has been found that television viewing increases your risk of dying from an inflammatory-related condition like Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease. But it's more complicated than that.
Research shows that night waking in infancy is associated with behavioural control challenges at three and four years of age. (Shutterstock)

Children and sleep: How much do they really need?

Poor sleep in infants and children has been linked to an array of problems, from aggression to poor school performance to diabetes, obesity and suicide. Our expert reviews the science.

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