Articles on sub-Saharan Africa

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Bill Gates, founder of Microsoft and co-chair of the eponymous foundation speaks at Pretoria University, Mamelodi Campus. His foundation is particularly active in the field of health care but also finances numerous institutions dedicated to research. Marco Longari/AFP

What is the influence of American foundations on universities in Africa?

American charitable foundations have gradually established themselves as key players in the African academic sector. If the benefits have been remarkable, there are risks as well.
Survivor of the mudslide are seen attending school on November 15, 2017 at the Old Skool Camp, in the mountain town of Regent on the outskirts of Sierra Leone’s capital Freetown. Saidu Bah/AFP

Can education become truly egalitarian worldwide?

About 263 million children and youth worldwide are out of school. If some progress have been made, especially on school attendance, huge gaps remain on gender parity or equity in schooling choices.
The genocide memorial in Kigali. Humanitarian workers in Rwanda had to deal daily with the horrors of war. Trocaire/Flickr

Living through the horrors of genocide: humanitarian workers in Rwanda

It is shocking to see the extent to which humanitarian workers in Rwanda became regular eyewitnesses to violence, murder and large-scale massacres in 1994.
As cities in developing countries - like Lagos in Nigeria, pictured here - grow, so do obesity risks. Reuters/Akintunde Akinleye

Developing countries could get sick before they get rich. Policy can help

Governments must understand that the factors making cities convenient and productive also make their residents prone to obesity. They must confront this challenge with intelligent, focused policies.
Many girls in Dar es Salaam’s slums drop out of school because of the costs involved.

Jobs and paid-for schooling can keep Tanzanian girls from early marriages

Creating more opportunities for young women and girls to work and earn money is a possible solution to early marriages. Subsidising secondary education to keep poorer girls in school is another.
Since 1800, the world’s population has multiplied seven and a half times. Shutterstock

Is the Earth over-populated?

The world’s population has reached 7.5 billion and is expected to climb to nearly 10 billion by 2050. Why will population growth inevitably continue? Should we try to reduce or stop this growth?
Tackling local diseases like rabies could help health authorities identify new outbreaks more easily. N. Bastiaensen/World Organisation for Animal Health

Dealing with local diseases helps countries tackle new outbreaks

By tackling local threats and controlling existing diseases, countries are able to build the capacity needed to deal with future emerging disease threats.
Residents collect water in one of the many wells dug in the bed of a dried-up river in the Dierma region of Burkina Faso. Marc Bournof/IRD

The immense challenge of desertification in sub-Saharan Africa

Dry areas make up more than 41% of land around the globe and are home to more than two billion people. Despite climate change and other challenges, there are ways to combat land degradation.

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